Panko crusted salmon

Panko crusted anything is good. I’ve done it on salmon before but as a cheat using olive oil as an adherent. Tonight, I used the old fashioned plain flour and egg method to crumb (or bread as American cooks seem to say) the salmon.

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Panko crusted salmon with pearl barley couscous Gary Lum love lime Lime zest Lyme
Panko crusted salmon with pearl barley couscous
Panko crusted salmon with pearl barley couscous Gary Lum love lime Lime zest Lyme
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Panko crusted salmon
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
5 mins
Total Time
10 mins
 

Panko crusted anything is good. I’ve done it on salmon before but as a cheat using olive oil as an adherent. Tonight, I used the old fashioned plain flour and egg method to crumb the salmon.

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 300 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 1 piece Salmon (tail end)
  • ½ cup Plain flour
  • 1 piece Egg
  • 1 splash Full cream milk
  • ½ cup Panko breadcrumbs
  • 4 tablespoons Olive oil
Instructions
  1. Add the flour to the plastic bag the salmon is wrapped in and coat the salmon in flour.
  2. Beat the egg in the milk and bathe the floured salmon in the egg-milk mixture.
  3. Coat the salmon in the Panko breadcrumbs and allow the salmon to cool in the refrigerator for about 5 minutes.
  4. Heat up a frying pan and add the olive oil.
  5. Gently lay-in the salmon skin side down and shallow fry, agitating occasionally to ensure it doesn’t stick to the frying pan.

  6. After a few minutes turn the salmon over and finish cooking. It will probably take five minutes in total.
  7. Allow the salmon to rest for a minute or two.
  8. Plate up with whatever vegetables you want.
  9. Shoot a photograph and eat the salmon and enjoy the moist tender flaky flesh in your mouth along with the crispy crunch of the Panko crumbs.
  10. Hope the photograph looks good and then blog about it and hope some more that people will share the recipe on social media.
Panko crusted salmon with pearl barley couscous Gary Lum love lime Lime zest Lyme
Panko crusted salmon with pearl barley couscous

Can I crumb other things?

Yep, you can crumb any meat and even vegetables.

Could I deep fry rather than shallow fry the salmon?

Sure, I don’t think it would be as nice though nor as easy to control the cooking. But I’m all for deep frying anything.

Is there a vegetarian version?

Of salmon? No. There’s no vegetarian version of salmon. You could crumb a piece of tofu or a mushroom rissole if that is what you want.

What else did you eat today?

For breakfast, I had a jalapeño Spam and smoked cheddar sausage roll.

Jalapeño Spam and smoked cheddar sausage roll Gary Lum
Jalapeño Spam and smoked cheddar sausage roll

For lunch, I had leftover spicy asparagus soup.

Leftover Spam of asparagus spicy soup. What you don't see is the dollop of sour cream in the bottom of the bowl. Gary Lum Panko crumbed salmon
Leftover Spam of asparagus spicy soup. What you don’t see is the dollop of sour cream in the bottom of the bowl.

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9 Responses

  1. Crumbed salmon! It sounds very similar to a chicken parma, but fish with way more crumbs encrusting it 😂 And a good browning for a definite crunch too 😂

    I don’t subscribe to blogs via email. I have the ones in my WP reader, and then I have the ones where if I like them enough and support what they do, I will know their posting patterns and visit every day or every other day 😂 Oddly enough, Firefox is still not showing comments on your Asparagus post but IE is (I loaded the page, and refreshed and the new comments came up). I have a similar issue with another blog I follow, but that’s about it. Maybe I should try clearing my cache 😂

    1. Cache clearing is always worthwhile. I do it regularly as a bit of housekeeping.
      One of the good things when I moved from WordPress[dot]com to WordPress[dot]org was knowing that Jetpack was available so I could have the benefits of the WordPress Reader. Commenting and replying to comments in the WP Reader is so much easier.

  2. Your recipes are adding creativity to my previously plain manner of food prep! For years it was plain salmon, backed, a little lemon maybe!

    If I wanted exotic eats, I’d head out to a restaurant….I never turned to the recipe books. And so, I fumbled around the kitchen. I made a few memorable meals for a few gatherings over the years, but mostly for me, my food was always bland. 🙂 I was okay with that, subscribing to the “I eat to live. I don’t live to eat” tenet.

    I was confused, however. 🙂

    So, when I saw this place and how you cook for one, I was like, yes! This is great! Oh, I can add stuff to my core meal and it doesn’t have to be complicated and I don’t have to sort out the recipes. I’m sure there are cooking for one cookbooks, but again, for me, the absolute best recipes come from friends and family! I kind of enjoy thinking about them, how they would feel if they tasted my version of their recipe. It’s all about the connection between food, joy, and people, my friend.

    So, thanks yet again for another delicious recipe! Ha… (the sour cream at the bottom of the asparagus soup is a DELICIOUS SURPRISE! Yes!)

    You’re a rock star, mister. I thanks you.

    1. Thank you JM. You are a star. Thanks for the lovely comment.
      There are days when I wish I didn’t spend so much of my time thinking about food and how to prepare. I’ve been like this for as long as I can remember.
      I do like a little flavour surprise in things, hence the sour cream dollop 😃

    2. But all the thought you put into it, along with your blog will reach those of us who need to put MORE thought into our food! See how that works? 🙂

      You’re a gift to my palate, my friend. I thank you.

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