How to make a Garlo’s lean beef pie taste better

Garlo’s lean beef pies taste great but here’s how to make one taste better.

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Restaurant Business Plan

There’s something about a meat pie on a cold day. Perfect for lunch. The Garlo’s brand meat pies are pretty good. I like that they’re available from Coles and usually available. I also like the sausage rolls. Today is was a Garlo’s lean beef pie.

Garlo's lean beef pie, potato gems and chips Gary Lum
Garlo’s lean beef pie, potato gems and chips

Regular readers know that I’m a fan of potato gems (or tater tots to my American fans). I also had some chips leftover and had them for lunch too.

The trick to making any meat pie better is to add a little Worchestershire sauce under the hood. You can lift the top off or do what I did and cut a cross in the top and let the sauce drizzle in by capillary action.

Recipe

Garlo's lean beef pie, potato gems and chips Gary Lum
Print
How to make a Garlo’s lean beef pie taste better
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 
Here’s how to make a Garlo’s lean beef pie taste better with some Worcestershire sauce, cheese, potato gems and chips
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 1 Garlo’s lean beef pie
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 slice Cheddar cheese
  • 6 potato gems
  • Smith’s cheese and onion chips
Instructions
  1. Thaw a Garlo’s lean beef pie and cut a cross in the top
  2. In the hole drizzle in a couple of teaspoons of Worcestershire sauce
  3. Add a slice of cheddar cheese on top
  4. Place the pie on a baking tray and next to it place half a dozen potato gems
  5. Cook in a benchtop oven at 200 °C for 30 minutes
  6. Add some barbeque sauce and plate up
  7. Shoot a photograph and eat lunch
  8. Write the recipe and blog hoping people who read this will share it on social media, especially on their Facebook pages and Twitter accounts.

Restaurant Business Planning

So during the week Katrina from Alsco sent me an e-mail asking if I’d mention a post about restaurant business planning. Wen I looked through the page I saw one of my favourite food bloggers, Lorraine Elliot from Not Quite Nigella so I thought why not. Click on the link and check out the page if you’re thinking about starting up a restaurant.

Frequently asked questions

How many meat pies do you reckon you’ve eaten in your life?

Given I had one a week throughout school, I reckon it would have to be at least 1000 meat pies.

Tomato or barbeque sauce?

I’m partial to barbeque sauce.

Does cheese make a pie better?

Cheese makes everything better.

Why do Americans call potato gems tater tots?

I have no idea.

Social media

Please follow me on my food-based social media on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram. What I’d love you to do is share this post on Twitter and Facebook and anywhere else you’d like, even Google+

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Medical Fun Facts

You may also like this post about cheesy nuggets and potato gems.

Cloud porn over Lake Ginninderra Gary Lum
Cloud porn over Lake Ginninderra

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22 Responses

  1. Tater Tots are perfectly named. Itty bitty ground up shredded taters in a bite size package! (It is also a great nick name, in the singular, for a small person who is from Idaho) Q- Are meat pies similar to pasties or pot pies? A pot pie is a pie with meat and veggies inside and a pasty/pastie (not to be confused with what might be worn on a woman’s breast) is a yummy pocket pie. And does the name change with adding sweet yummy fillings?

    1. An Australian meat pie is basically beef and gravy inside a pastry base with a puff pastry top. Cornish pasties are different and more like a pocket with a crimped join.
      Pot pies here are usually a pie in a small bowl with a pastry lid.
      An Australian meat pie is never sweet, it’s always savoury.

    2. OK, what is a fruit mince pie? I thought mince was meat. I’d google it, but you are more interesting. :o)

    3. Fruit ‘mincemeat’ includes raisins, sultanas, cherries, apricot, cranberries, mixed peel, currants, dates, marmalade and some alcohol which is all boiled up, reduced and put into pastry shells. They’re a traditional Egnlish/Australian Christmas treat.

  2. A pie to warm you up on a cold day. Love how you added a slice of cheddar cheese on top. Did you buy them in slices, or was this sliced from the block? The cheese looks around, so I’m taking it was extra tasty…just the way I like my cheese – more orange, the heavier and the better when I am in the mood.

    I notice all of your meals are ‘Australian’. Could be enough recipes already for an Aussie meals for one book 😀

    Can never go wrong with chips….never.

    1. I used some sliced smoked cheddar. It’s quite nice.
      haha, one day I may cook something Chinese, but you’re right, the blog is now focussing on recipes so I can put them all together for an e-book at some stage.

    2. Smoked cheddar. Now you are taking cheese to a higher level. Quality all the way 😀

      Aha. I knew it that you will have a book in the works. I cannot wait to buy it. With luck, I will be the first customer 😀

    3. I need to start a short story I promised another reader months ago and being a book outline. It may have to be a long service leave project!

    1. That’s a fantastic idea Lorraine. I can imagine myself having a cable TV show too like the ones about cars 😃

  3. potato gems? cool. or how about starch nuggets? heh…cloud porn? lolz!!!! Worcestershire makes everything better, including shepard’s pie…nom, nom, nom. lovely post, mister. ❤︎

  4. i have to agree with Kris that “tater tot” makes perfect sense, “tot” being a rare word for ‘a small amount’, and ‘”tater” a rather low-brow way to say potato. However, “gem” seems like a nice way to go, too. A bit flattering, perhaps. I don’t really eat meat pies though, because they remind me of Sweeney Todd.

    1. Thanks Jeff. The slang for potato here is spud. To avoid copyright problems there’s another brand which sells potato royales!

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