Meals for one

How long does it take to cook a Coles chicken Kiev with a MEATER®?

How long does it take to cook a Coles chicken Kiev with a MEATER®?

One of my most visited posts here is How long does it take to cook a Coles chicken Kiev? from about this time last year.

Photos Q&ASubscribe

This is a photograph of Saturday dinner. Coles chicken Kiev with finger lime fennel salad 💚

Now that I have my MEATER® I thought it would be useful to work out how long it would take using a little measurement science.

I couldn’t get any pieces of chicken Kiev from the delicatessen section at Coles, so I bought some Coles branded chicken Kiev from the frozen food section.

I had to wait for the pieces to thaw before I could bury the MEATER® deep into the chicken Kiev. I did worry that it may allow seepage of garlicky cheesy goodness during the cooking process around the shaft of the MEATER®.

In addition to the chicken Kiev I prepared a fennel salad and when I say prepared, I had leftover fennel salad vacuum packed using my Sunbeam FoodSaver®.

Recipe

Coles chicken Kiev and finger lime fennel salad with extra limey goodness
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 
How long should you cook a Coles chicken Kiev? Well, tonight I used theMEATER® to find out how long.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 2 pieces Coles chicken Kiev
  • Fennel salad leftover and vacuum packed
  • Finger limes
  • Lime juice
  • Lime zest
Instructions
  1. Allow the frozen pieces of chicken to thaw and then insert theMEATER®
    This is a photograph of a packet of Coles chicken Kiev. Two pieces per box.
  2. Place into an oven at 200 °C/400 °F and cook according to theMEATER® app
    This is a photograph of the chicken Kiev pieces with the MEATER® inserted into one of them.
  3. Reduce the vacuum seal containing the dry fennel salad components
  4. Toss with some lime juice and olive oil
  5. Add the juice-filled sacs from Australian finger limes
  6. Plate up the chicken and salad
  7. Shoot a photograph
  8. Eat the meal
  9. Wash the dishes
  10. Write the recipe
  11. Write a blog post and hope my readers will share the recipe on social media
Recipe Notes

I deliberately do not calculate energy for dishes. I deliberately default to 500 Calories or 500,000 calories because I do not make these calculations.

 

Photographs

This is a photograph of a packet of Saxa iodised salt flakes

This is a photograph of three Australian finger limes arranged on a cutting board.

This is a photograph of a packet of Coles chicken Kiev. Two pieces per box.

This is a photograph of the chicken Kiev pieces with the MEATER® inserted into one of them.

This is a photograph of Saturday dinner. Coles chicken Kiev with finger lime fennel salad 💚

This is a photograph of Saturday dinner. Coles chicken Kiev with finger lime fennel salad 💚

Questions and answers

The packet recommended 35 minutes at 200 °C/400 °F. You can see from the chart that theMEATER® matched that time.

This is the MEATER® app cook chart for this meal. It shows the cooking time of 35 minutes.

Were you happy with the outcome?

Yes, I am. The crumb coating was crunchy and the meat was moist and tender. There wasn’t a huge amount of seepage of butter during the cooking process.

Is there any point in using the MEATER® in future for Coles chicken Kiev?

Probably not unless I change the cooking temperature.

What are finger limes like?

Each finger contains about a 100 or so taut juice-filled sacs of tangy goodness. They are really refreshing. The finger limes were a good accompaniment with the fennel salad.

Final words

Chicken Kiev isn’t exactly low carb so I regard them as a treat and not a regular food for me.

Porterhouse Steak Heston Style

This is a collage of four photographs to create a long pin for Pinterest

Oven roasted scotch fillet steak with cheesy creamy vegetables Meater review

Oven roasted scotch fillet steak with cheesy creamy vegetables

MEATER® review

Photos Questions

At the beginning of every January, Trevor Long, Chris Bowen and Geoff Quattromani from the EFTM podcast make their annual pilgrimage to CES in Las Vegas. EFTM is a technology, motor car and lifestyle podcast primarily aimed at blokes. It’s not safe for work (NSFW), it’s not safe for kids to listen to, and, it is very blokey. While at CES Geoff wrote a review of the MEATER®️ meat thermometer on the EFTM website.

This is a photograph of my scotch fillet steak cooked rare with the cheesy creamy horseradish flavoured vegetables in a dish. The meat is cut and obviously rare.

While I own and use very basic meat thermometers, using one requires opening and closing the oven door multiples times. I prefer not to open the door until the food is ready. The Bluetooth and wireless capability of the MEATER®️ meat thermometer sounded like a good solution. It would mean I could cook meat for the right period of time without overcooking the flesh.

I went to the MEATER®️ website and looked through all the information and decided to buy one. The manufacturers have an Australian agent and as soon as I completed the order I received an e-mail explaining the product was ordered but there would be a slight delay. About a week later I received another e-mail informing me of another slight delay. All in all, the total waiting time was about a month. This didn’t really worry me and I was grateful for the regular updates.

When my new MEATER®️ meat thermometer arrived at my post office box, I was really impressed with the no-frills packaging. It gave me the feeling of a precision instrument.

This is a photograph of the MEATER® in its box

I’ve used my MEATER®️ meat thermometer about half a dozen times now in chicken (Maryland pieces), beef (scotch fillet steak) and pork (chops). It’s been brilliant. The meat has been cooked well and each meal has been distinguished by moist, tender and juicy animal flesh. I’m yet to try lamb, but I can’t imagine there will be any problems.

The iOS app works well and I’ve not experienced any Bluetooth connection problems. On Instagram and Twitter search for #meatermade to get an idea of the sorts of meals, people are cooking with their MEATER®️ meat thermometer. After each meal is cooked, I get an e-mail survey asking me how my meal was. I’ll probably turn this feature off when the novelty wears off. Notifications in the app work well and five minutes (this can be adjusted) before the end of the cooking time a tone is emitted and it gives you enough time to prepare to get the meat out and to allow the meat to rest.

This is a screenshot from the MEATER® iOS app of tonight's cook.

Leave the MEATER®️ meat thermometer in the meat until resting is complete and then simply wash it in warm soapy water. It comes in a wooden box which houses an AAA battery which charges the probe before each use.

This is a photograph of the box which my MEATER® came in.

Recipe

Oven roasted scotch fillet steak with cheesy creamy vegetables
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Oven roasted scotch fillet steak using the MEATER®️ meat thermometer to achieve a perfect medium rare steak which I served with some cheesy creamy vegetables.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 1 Scotch fillet steak seasoned with salt, pepper, and garlic powder and vacuum packed.
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Peas
  • Corn
  • Cream
  • Cheese grated
  • Horseradish cream
Instructions
  1. Pat the steak dry and season both sides with iodised salt, black pepper and garlic powder.
  2. Vacuum pack and refrigerate overnight.
    This is a photograph of the seasoned scotch fillet steak in its vacuum packing.
  3. Remove the steak from the refrigerator an hour before cooking to get it to room temperature.
    This is a photograph of the scotch fillet steak with the MEATER® inserted
  4. Insert the MEATER®️ meat thermometer into the steak and place on a baking sheet.
  5. Place the steak into a preheated oven (200 °C/400 °F).

  6. Cook using the MEATER®️ App.
  7. Rest the meat as per the app.
  8. While the steak was cooking put the broccoli, cauliflower, peas and corn into a microwave radiation safe container and cook using microwave radiation until the broccoli is soft.
  9. Drain the vegetables and put them in an ovenproof dish with some cream and cheese.
  10. When the steak and Brussels sprouts are removed from the oven, put the vegetables into the oven, turn the heat up to high to brown the cheese.
  11. Sear the steak with a torch or use a hot frying pan or if you want the best, go outside and use a flamethrower.
    This is a photograph of the rare scotch fillet steak which I've cut into slices.
  12. Serve the steak and vegetables on a plate.
    This is a photograph of my scotch fillet steak cooked rare with the cheesy creamy horseradish flavoured vegetables in a dish. The meat is cut and obviously rare.
  13. Shoot a photograph.
  14. Savour the meal.
  15. Write the recipe.
  16. Write the blog post.
  17. Hope your readers will share the post on social media.
Recipe Notes

I do not work out, look up or calculate the energy content of my meals. In this recipe plugin I have to add a figure, so I default to 500 Calories (500,000 calories).

Photographs

As well as some photographs of dishes I’ve previously cooked using the MEATER®.

Click on one image and then scroll through all the photographs.

Questions and answers

What’s the advantage of using a meat thermometer?

The most important reason is food safety. You do not want to undercook your meat. This is especially true for poultry. Always shop, prepare and cook with an assumption in your head that every chicken, duck, turkey and goose contains Salmonella and Campylobacter in its main cavity. Given the proximity of the main body cavity with the major cut of flesh, bacterial contamination is really easy.

For chicken, you want the internal temperature to get to about 75 °C/167 °F.

For mammals, most cuts are large muscle bundles and are effectively isolated from the body cavities. Mammal meat is relatively safe when it comes to pathogenic bacteria assuming the meat processing and butchering have been managed safely.

Because, most mammalian meat is best eaten rare or bordering on medium rare, precise temperature measurement is an advantage. Hence, the advantage of a meat thermometer.

What’s your favourite cut of beef?

There’s a lot of argument on what makes a good steak. In my find, a good steak tastes beefy and it is tender. The best compromise for pan frying in my limited experience is scotch fillet or rib eye fillet steak.

The flavour though of porterhouse or rump cap is really rich and if I could cook that so it was tender I’d be really happy.

There may be a change on that front soon. I’ve purchased a water recirculator and I’m going to experiment with sous vide cooking.

Should you use a steak knife when eating steak?

OMG, yes. Cutting steak effectively and efficiently adds to the whole eating experience. While you can cut a properly cooked steak with a butter knife, why would you? A well-weighted steak knife makes all the difference. A well-balanced steak knife is a thing of beauty. A well-made steak knife is a tool to treasure, protect and maintain.

You seem to like the MEATER®️ meat thermometer. Were you paid by them for this review?

No, Yummy Lummy currently receives no sponsorship or financial support. If MEATER®️ wants to send me products to try, I’m happy to discuss an opportunity.

Update (Tuesday, 13 February, 2018)

I was asked about the price of the MEATER®, I was able to buy it on-line in January 2018 for AUD$129.

Final words

So I’ve dipped my toes back into podcasting. I recently closed off my health and medical podcast so I can now focus entirely on food blogging.

I will be recording and dropping a regular weekly show soon. It will be called, “The Yummy Lummy Cooking for one podcast.”

What I’ve done recently is start a super short random show named, “Random Yummy.” I’ve dropped two shows so far. You can find them at:

https://YummyLummy.com/RY0001

https://YummyLummy.com/RY0002

Let me know what you think.

So dear reader, do you regularly use a meat thermometer? Let me know in the comments section below.

Australia Day Poppy and Sesame seed crusted salmon and Moreton Bay bug salad

Australia Day Poppy and Sesame seed crusted salmon and Moreton Bay bug salad

Friday, 26 January 2018 was Australia Day. A public holiday in Australia and a day of some controversy. Yummy Lummy isn’t keen on controversy, so let’s stick with food.

PhotosQuestions

The Australian lamb industry over many years has endeavoured to socially engineer Australians into thinking the best meat element of a meal to serve on Australia is lamb. I love lamb, and I’ve certainly indulged in the heady heights of commercial supplication in years gone by. This year was different. Not because I was protesting the idea of lamb on Australia Day, no, it just didn’t happen. True story.

Thongs Australia Day
New thongs. Maroon! Because Queenslander!!!

Where the bloody hell was I on Australia Day?

Yea, I know, when a sentence starts, “Where the bloody hell…?” You’re thinking Lara Bingle, and let’s face it, my face and body are just about as far removed from an image of Lara’s as you can imagine. I mean, who’d want to look like Lara, when you could look like me 😂🤣

For readers who aren’t Australian, this is what we call, “taking the piss”. You may find this post is a little more strine that normal. No apologies cobber, Straya day comes but once a year, which for every one else, means annually. 💚💛🇦🇺

Rather than baking in the hot dry heat of Canberra, I was lapping up the warmth and humidity of Brisbane. My vulgar ichthyoid skin was drinking in the sweet sultry nectar of balmy Brisbane. I was like a lizard sunning itself on a rock next to a hot misty billabong. I was happier than a pig in mud.

I was visiting my parents and children. In my other blog, viz., My Thoughts and Stuff, you may have read how I’ve had a sick relative who was diagnosed with bowel carcinoma and then had quite awful post-operative complications involving intensive care. I’m happy to report that my formerly sick relative is well on the road to recovery now.

So what did Yummy Lummy eat on Australia Day 2018?

I promise we’ll get to a recipe, but this post needs a little padding.

Breakfast

I enjoyed the breakfast of champions, or at least the breakfast of those wishing to shed some kilograms.

Scrambled eggs made with butter and seasoned with iodised salt and dried mixed herbs

Breakfast of champions. Scrambled eggs. Australia Day.
Friday breakfast. Scrambled eggs with mixed dried herbs and butter for flavour.

Lunch

My cousin and her husband were also visiting Brisvegas and they joined me, my parents and my children for lunch at Kinn + Derm Chermside. I like this particular cousin. She’s a fairly direct person and says what she thinks. No mucking around with her.

There were seven of us so we looked through the menu and asked for enough dishes to feed us all. A regular theme when I’m out with family at restaurants, is just how well Lums can eat. This meal was no exception. We asked for chicken pad Thai, basil beef and chilli with an egg, massaman beef, red duck curry, crispy pork belly, green paw paw salad, soft shelled crab with sweet chilli jam and extra soft shelled crab in a curry sauce. There was also another chicken dish but I can’t remember what it was. See what happened there? Beef, pork, chicken, duck, and crab but no lamb. It wasn’t intentional. It just happened. As far as I’m concerned, eating Thai on a Australia Day is a great thing to do, especially for dinkum Australians like the Lum family.

My first of many plates, yea, it’s all brown but the plate contained a heap of different flavours. We were in the back in the dark, so the lighting isn’t great.

Friday lunch. Kinn Derm Thai. Australia Day.
Friday lunch. Kinn Derm Thai.

Fair shake of the sauce bottle, stop yer whingin’ about the poor photography…

Dinner

I rarely cook for anyone else and truth be told, I am very shy and nervous about cooking for others. I know it seems odd, but no one will ever get invited to the one bedroom flat I rent for a meal. It’s just too stressful. I’m also messy and I’m embarrassed by my mess.

Cooking for family though is different. I feel relaxed in the kitchen when I’m with family and it’s a good feeling when I have one of my children standing next to me and we’re chatting and doing knife work together.

For Australia Day dinner, I originally thought I’d do something simple like baked salmon and salad, but then on Friday morning, I noticed the fish shop at Westfield Chermside was open for business so I asked about their Moreton Bay bugs (Thenus orientalis). I bought four small bugs for $20. That meant I didn’t need to buy as much salmon.

My plan was to crust the salmon with poppy and sesame seeds to make it look like a Lamington which is an iconic Australian cake. I’d stir-fry a whole heap of kale slaw and flavour it with horseradish cream. I’d refrain from adding bird’s eye chillies because my mother isn’t too keen on very spicy food at the moment, so I got some hot chilli flakes so I could garnish individual dishes at the end.

Mum suggested for dessert we have some Cornettos. I chose the flavour. What could be more Australia Day than Golden Gaytime Gaynettos?

Recipe

Australia Day Poppy and Sesame seed crusted salmon and Moreton Bay bug salad
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
Australia Day Poppy and Sesame seed crusted (Lammy) salmon and Moreton Bay bug salad was a winning combination for a sultry evening in balmy Brisbane on Friday night.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 4
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 4 Cooked Moreton Bay bugs Thenus orientalis aka slipper lobster
  • 3 Tasmanian Atlantic salmon fillets each cut in half
  • Poppy seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Dried hot chilli flakes
  • 2 packets Kale slaw with sesame and pumpkin seeds
  • 1 tablespoon Horseradish cream
  • 1 tablespoon Sour cream to cut the bite of the horseradish cream
  • 1 avocado diced
  • 1 lime quartered
  • 50 grams Butter
  • 1 splash Olive oil
Instructions
  1. Remove the shell from the tail of the Moreton Bay bugs, slice them sagittally and the make transverse cuts to give you large dices of tail muscle.
    Moreton Bay bugs Australia Day
  2. Put the Moreton Bay bug meat into a bowl with the quartered lime in the refrigerator.
    Moreton Bay bugs and lime Australia Day
  3. Slice the salmon fillets in half so from the three original pieces you end up with six.
    Salmon Australia Day
  4. Place them in a plastic bag and add the splash of olive oil. Then gently massage the oil onto all the out surfaces of the salmon.
  5. On a sheet of baking paper, pour half a cup of sesame seeds and half a cup of poppy seeds. Stick your finger into it and mix so you get a good mix of the two seed types on the paper.
    Poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon Australia Day
  6. Remove one piece of salmon and carefully coat the outer surface with the poppy and sesame seeds and then place the coated salmon onto a piece of baking paper which is on a baking tray. Repeat the process for all the pieces of salmon.
  7. Bake the salmon at 250 °C for 15 minutes.
  8. While the salmon is cooking, get a large frying pan hot and them melt the butter.
  9. When the butter begins to foam and turn brown, add the kale slaw and with chop sticks stir-fry until the kale has wilted. Remove the frying pan from the heat and transfer the slaw into a large salad bowl and stir in the horseradish cream and sour cream.
  10. After the salmon has baked, remove it from the oven and allow it to rest for 5 minutes.
  11. As the salmon is resting, stir in the avocado through the stir-fried kale slaw. Add the juice from half a lime.
  12. At this stage, you could also fold in the pieces of Moreton Bay bug to give your guests some nice flavour bombs in the salad. I elected to add my bug meat on top of the salad for the visual appeal.
  13. Serve the salad onto a plate. Garnish it with dried hot chilli flakes if you know it’s safe for that person.
    Friday dinner Australia Day 💚💛🇦🇺 Poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon with Moreton Bay bug topped kale and avocado slaw salad flavoured with horseradish cream.
  14. Place the bug meat on top of the salad.
  15. Alongside the salad place a piece of poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon.
  16. Shoot a photograph and then eat, savour and enjoy your 2018 Australia Day dinner.
Recipe Notes

I do not take the time or make the effort to work out the energy content of the food I cook. I default all my recipes to 500 Calories (that is, 500,000 calories). In my mind counting calories is not how I want to live.

 

Photographs

Moreton Bay bugs

Friday Australia Day 💚💛🇦🇺 Moreton Bay Bugs (Thenus orientalis)
Friday Australia Day 💚💛🇦🇺 Moreton Bay Bugs (Thenus orientalis)
Moreton Bay bugs Australia Day
Moreton Bay bugs
Moreton Bay bugs and lime Australia Day
Moreton Bay bugs and lime
Moreton Bay bugs and lime Australia Day
Moreton Bay bugs and lime

Salmon

Salmon Australia Day

Poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon Australia Day
Poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon

Dinner is served

Friday dinner Australia Day 💚💛🇦🇺 Poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon with Moreton Bay bug topped kale and avocado slaw salad flavoured with horseradish cream.
Friday dinner Australia Day 💚💛🇦🇺 Poppy and sesame seed crusted salmon with Moreton Bay bug topped kale and avocado slaw salad flavoured with horseradish cream.

Dessert is a Golden Gaytime Gaynetto

 

 

Golden Gaytime Gaynetto Australia Day
Friday dessert. Australia Day 💚💛🇦🇺 Golden Gaytime Gaynetto

 

Questions and answers

It’s bloody Australia Day, where the bloody hell is the lamb?

Struth mate, just because some Aussie Rules buffoon of yesteryear gets on the bloody box and makes a few jokes at the expense of the less well off, that is, Australians not blessed to have been born in the greatest nation on earth, there’s no reason to get ya knickers in a knot.

I love lamb, I love mutton flaps, I like lambs fry and crumbed lamb’s brains in a delicate white sauce with onions, but just because it’s Australia Day doesn’t mean I have to bend to some commercial pressure to eat a baby sheep.

Will you ever cook for someone who isn’t in the Yummy Lummy family?

Nup, never. It’s not happening. I’m too shy to have people around. I get nervous just thinking about cooking for someone else. What if she doesn’t like what I cook? What if she spits it out? Too much pressure.

Sure I love to cook. Cooking is therapeutic for me. I prefer to enjoy my therapy alone and share it later online.

When will you have lamb?

Dunno mate. I might try those Vegemite lamb snags that Coles is spruiking. They look interesting and I mean mate, Vegemite is tops.

You look like a Chinaman, what’s with the Strine?

Bloody oath. I’m fifth generation. On my Mum’s side (Dad’s family is Chinese too but they come from Fiji), the family came out from China looking for gold in God’s own, that is, Queensland. They found a bit I reckon and then they owned and worked on sugar cane farms around Bundy (aka Bundaberg). After that, they moved to Sydney for some import/export work but when the Japs got into Sydney Harbour they moved to Texas (no not Texas in the US you drongo, the great Queensland town of Texas near the Cockroach, erm, NSW border). After that they owned and cooked in Chinese restaurants cooking chop suey for all the unsuspecting gwai lo truckies at the Rocklea truck stop. The Golden Pagoda was the name, but it got destroyed by the 1974 Brisbane floods.

Apology

Okay, I’ve had a bit of fun with this post. Australia Day is an important food holiday and being an Australian, I’ve taken a few language liberties. Yummy Lummy will be back to normal next post.

Check out what else I did on the weekend.

Click on this photograph of me

 

Roast pork and Moreton Bay Bug spicy chilli kale cabbage stir-fry with horseradish cream

Food for Australia Day 2017

Anchor Note for young readers, I didn’t write a “steamy billabong” because I’m also pedantic, and steam, is an invisible gas. It’s the gaseous phase of water when water is boiled to 100 °C (that’s Celsius and not Centrigrade) at STP. That’s standard temperature and pressure and not sticky toilet paper.

Vegemite and Coon cheese chicken

Vegemite and Coon cheese chicken

Vegemite has been in the news over the last couple of weeks. Coles announced Vegemite infused snags in time for Australia Day and award-winning chef, Neil Perry, created Vegemite burgers for the Australian Open (tennis tournament).

Jump to Recipe YouTube Photos Questions

Vegemite Coon cheese Yummy Lummy Gary Lum

Yummy Lummy isn’t a site for a discussion about Australia Day and whether we should celebrate it and have a public holiday every 26 January. Suffice to say, from a food blog perspective, my interest in Australia Day is about what to eat.

With Vegemite on my mind, I thought what could I cook with this lovely paste of yeasty goodness? While I was grocery shopping on Saturday (2018-01-20) I spotted a tube of the delicious black paste and thought how I could use a tube.

While grocery shopping at Coles I bought some chicken thigh fillets and I wondered how the black gold might taste with chicken. I know it complements steak beautifully, I just wasn’t sure about chicken.

Recipe

Vegemite and Coon cheese chicken
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 15 mins
 
Vegemite and Coon cheese stuffed into a roll of chicken thigh, roasted and served on a bed of stir-fried beetroot slaw flavoured with horseradish cream.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 3 Chicken thigh fillets
  • Vegemite
  • Iodised salt
  • Cracked black pepper
  • Dried hot chilli flakes
  • Dried mixed herbs
  • Sesame seeds
  • Poppy seeds
  • Grated Coon cheese
  • Beetroot slaw
  • Butter
  • Horseradish cream
Instructions
  1. Flatten and tenderise the chicken thigh fillets (see the YouTube video to see how I do it)
  2. Lay a ‘cable’ of Vegemite along the thigh fillet
  3. Season with salt, pepper, herbs, chilli flakes, sesame seeds and poppy seeds
  4. Add some grated Coon cheese
  5. Roll the chicken and pin with toothpicks
  6. Place on a tray lined with baking paper. Mine still had some bacon fat on it from breakfast which was a bonus.
  7. Cook in the oven for 35 minutes at 180 °C
  8. When the cooking time is complete allow the chicken to rest for 10 minutes
  9. Melt some butter in a hot frying pan
  10. Add in the beetroot slaw and stir-fry until the broccoli stalks are soft
  11. Add in some chilli flakes and stir
  12. Stir in some horseradish cream and turn off the heat
  13. Transfer the beetroot slaw to a plate and then add a piece of chicken
  14. Shoot a photograph and then eat the meal
  15. Write the recipe and write a blog post
  16. Share it on social media and hope that people share it around
Recipe Notes

I default the energy to 500 Calories. I have no idea how many Calories are in this dish.

 

YouTube video

Please click or touch the play button.

I’d love it if you hit the like button 👍 I’d be grateful if you subscribed and clicked on the bell 🛎 too.

Photograph

The final product

Chicken thigh fillet stuffed with Vegemite and Coon cheese served with horseradish beetroot slaw Yummy Lummy Gary Lum
Chicken thigh fillet stuffed with Vegemite and cheese served with horseradish beetroot slaw

Questions and answers

Do you like Vegemite?

I love the stuff. I can lick it off a spoon. I like it in hot water with chicken stock. I like seasoning steak and gravy with it. Of course, on toast is a given.

Do you have any advice for people trying Vegemite for the first time?

Yes, try just smearing it on some toast with (real) butter. Don’t trowl it on. As you get accustomed to it you can gradually get to licking it from a spoon as a snack.

Why do you like Coon cheese?

Coon cheese has a great sharp taste. It’s an Australian product like the black gold and I like combining the two products whenever it’s the right thing to do.

Do you know that coon is not a nice word?

Yes, I know that the word coon is offensive, but I’m talking about Coon cheese. It’s a brand and I want to acknowledge the brand.

Final verdict

I was pretty happy with the chicken. The flavour of the salty yeasty black goodness wasn’t overpowering. The chicken went nicely with the beetroot slaw with horseradish flavouring.

How is the new podcast coming along?

I’m still in the planning stages. I’ve drafted the first few episodes. I’ll start recording next month.

Food for Australia Day 2017

Quick and easy one pot roast panko chicken thigh and vegetable rice

 

Whisky flavoured chicken blue cheese casserole

Whisky flavoured chicken blue cheese casserole

Whisky flavoured chicken and blue cheese casserole may sound weird but the taste is amazing, especially with some nice Danish blue cheese melted throughout the chicken and vegetable mix. The flat smelt pretty good as the Danish blue was melting in the oven.

Check out the story on my renewed focus on food blogging.

Jump to RecipePhotos Questions

Tonight’s dish permits me to exploit my Tupperware Microwave oven pressure cooker and reduce the cooking time while intensifying the flavours of the meal. I love my Tupperware cooking products.

Artwork

I know it’s a bit of a stretch to call this art. I don’t have an artistic bent and even my closest friends point out my lack of skill. My desire though is to improve my drawing. I remember at high school and university, to help me learn I did a lot of drawings. On graduation, I’ve also relied on drawings to help me learn and remember. While few others would appreciate them, I still like drawing to help me remember.

Whisky flavoured casserole drawn by Gary Lum Yummy Lummy
Whisky flavoured casserole was drawn by Gary Lum

Recipe

Whisky flavoured chicken and blue cheese casserole
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
45 mins
Total Time
55 mins
 
Whisky flavoured chicken and blue cheese casserole may sound weird but the taste is amazing, especially with some nice Danish blue cheese melted throughout the chicken and vegetable mix.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 100 mL Scotch whisky
  • 1/2 handful Queensland nuts
  • 1/2 handful smoked almonds
  • 100 grams grated Coon cheese
  • 150 grams Danish blue cheese
  • 100 mL Pouring cream
  • 1/2 cup Frozen peas and corn
  • 1/2 cup Cauliflower florets
  • 1/2 cup Broccoli florets
  • 1 tablespoon chilli flakes
  • 2 cups Chicken stock
  • 1 Chicken thigh fillet pounded and cut into thin strips
  • 1 teaspoon Clive of India curry powder
Instructions
  1. In a Microwave oven, pressure cooker add the whisky, peas, corn, broccoli, cauliflower, chicken stock, curry powder, chicken, and chilli flakes.
  2. Cook in the microwave oven for a total of 15 minutes.
  3. Transfer the contents of the pressure cooker with a slotted spoon to an oven-safe glass bowl.
  4. Crumble the Danish blue cheese and mix through the hot chicken and vegetables.
  5. Pour the cream over the contents of the glass bowl.
  6. Mix the grated Coon cheese and the nuts and add them to the top of the bowl.
  7. Put the bowl into the oven at 250 °C for 20 minutes.
  8. Plate up in a fresh bowl and garnish with chopped parsley.
Recipe Notes

By default, I make all my recipes 500 calories.

 

Photograph

This is a photograph of the final dish. It was shot at 300 mm f/16 ISO 64 for 1.3 seconds on a Nikon D810 using a Nikkor 28–300 mm lens.

Whisky flavoured chicken and blue cheese casserole Gary Lum Yummy Lummy
Whisky flavoured chicken and blue cheese casserole

Questions

Don’t you react badly to alcohol?

Yes, I do. I go bright red and I get short of breath. The whisky though was cooked and most of the alcohol should have vaporised. The flavour though seems to be intensified.

Could you have cooked this conventionally on a stove top or in a simple Microwave-safe container at normal atmospheric pressure?

Sure but it would have taken an age and the flavours would not be intensified.

Curry lamb in a Tupperware® Pressure Cooker

What other advantages are there in using a pressure cooker?

A pressure cooker is also an autoclave and food cooked in an autoclave will be free of germs.

Tupperware® pressure cooker Gary Lum
Tupperware® pressure cooker

Super hot and spicy chicken wings that are low carb too

Super hot and spicy chicken wings that are low carb too

Spicy chicken wings were on my mind all day after I watched Megatoad (aka Matt Stonie) eating sixty-five (65) chicken wings on his YouTube channel. He starts mild and steps up to the really hot and spicy chicken wings towards the end and then has a mishap with sauce in his eye.

Jump to Recipe Photos Questions

I went grocery shopping this morning and picked up eight wings for $4.50.

In the meantime podcasting friends from the USA who were being snowed upon were talking about blazing hot buffalo wings too. I reckon if I was snowed upon and freezing cold I’d want hot and spicy chicken wings too. You could argue I’m eating these at the wrong time of the year, especially when today got to 37 °C (98.6 °F). I had the oven on for an hour so it warmed up the living area even more. I do like a warm environment and today was certainly warm, it’s a pity it wasn’t humid.

Chicken wings and thigh cutlets Super hot and spicy chicken wings

Recipe

Super hot and spicy chicken wings
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 15 mins
 

Super hot and spicy chicken wings made with ground Queensland nuts, smoked almonds, iodised salt, black peppercorns, smoked paprika, dried mixed herbs, bird’s eye chillies, and chilli flakes.

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 8 Chicken wings
  • 1 Handful Queensland nuts
  • 1/2 Handful Smoked almonds
  • 1 Tablespoon Iodised salt flakes
  • 1 Tablespoon Whole black peppercorns
  • 1 Tablespoon Smoked paprika
  • 1 Tablespoon Dried mixed herbs
  • 2 Dried bird's eye chillies
  • 1 Tablespoon Chilli flakes
  • 2 Handfuls Shredded kale
  • 1 Packet Coleslaw
  • 1 Tablespoon French mustard
  • 100 mL Pouring cream
Instructions
  1. In a coffee grinder, grind Queensland nuts, smoked almonds, iodised salt, black peppercorns, smoked paprika, dried mixed herbs, bird’s eye chillies, and chilli flakes.

  2. Rub this into the skin of eight chicken wings.

  3. Roast for 1 hour at 150 °C.

    Blazing hot chilli and pepper nut crusted chicken wings ready for the oven Super hot and spicy chicken wings Gary Lum
  4. Stir-fry the kale and coleslaw until the cabbage has wilted.

  5. Add the pouring cream and French mustard and stir through.

  6. Serve the wings on the stir-fried salad with some cream cheese.

Recipe Notes

By default I make all my recipes 500 Calories.

Photographs

Shredded Kale and coleslaw

This shot was taken while I was grocery shopping this morning.

Kale and coleslaw Hot and spicy chicken wings Gary Lum

Chilli and nut crusted chicken wings ready for the oven

I dried some bird’s eye chillis in the oven earlier in the afternoon to get the flat nice and cozy.

Blazing hot chilli and pepper nut crusted chicken wings ready for the oven Super hot and spicy chicken wings Gary Lum
Blazing hot chilli and pepper nut crusted chicken wings ready for the oven

Dinner is served

It may look like a large piece of cream cheese, but it went well with the hot and spicy chicken wings.

Blazing hot chilli and pepper nut crusted chicken wings served on stir-fried kale and cabbage salad with French mustard and cream Super hot and spicy chicken wings Gary Lum
Blazing hot chilli and pepper nut crusted chicken wings served on stir-fried kale and cabbage salad with French mustard and cream

Questions and answers

Why do you like hot and spicy chicken wings?

The meat is always tender, the skin is easy to get crispy and it’s always good to have some chilli and nuts every day.

What’s with the kale?

Lots of fibre and some iron.

How is this a low carb meal?

Rather than using any sugar or sweet syrups in the rub like a lot of recipes, I made a shot and spicy nutty rub and really massaged it into the skin.

Some other posts you make like to read

BBQ beef short ribs

Chicken wings and maple quinoa recipe

 

Roast pork and Moreton Bay Bug spicy chilli kale cabbage stir-fry with horseradish cream

Roast pork and Moreton Bay Bug spicy chilli kale cabbage stir-fry with horseradish cream

Please check out why I’m in Brisbane at the moment at My Thoughts and Stuff. It’s been a bit stressful but when there was a bit of good news I decided to splurge and celebrate a little.

Jump to Recipe Photos Questions

I combined roasted pork rasher with some Moreton Bay Bug (aka Slipper lobster, flathead lobster, Thenus orientalis) plus some spicy chilli kale and cabbage stir-fry with horseradish cream.

Did you know that Moreton Bay Bugs and Balmain Bugs are different species? The eyes on the MBBs are farther apart and I reckon Moreton Bay Bugs taste superior to those named after the Sydney suburb of Balmain.

Recipe

Roast pork and Moreton Bay Bug spicy chilli kale cabbage stir-fry with horseradish cream
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 5 mins
 
I combined roasted pork rasher with some Moreton Bay Bug (aka Slipper lobster, flathead lobster, Thenus orientalis) plus some spicy chilli kale and cabbage stir-fry with horseradish cream.
Servings: 2
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 4 Pork rashers with the rind off
  • 2 Moreton Bay Bugs
  • 1 Packet Kale coleslaw
  • 4 Bird’s eye chillies
  • 1 teaspoon Horseradish cream
  • 1 teaspoon Sour cream
Instructions
  1. Place the pork rashers into a hot (220 °C) oven for 1 hour
  2. Remove the head of the Moreton Bay Bug
  3. Split the tail on half lengthways
  4. Remove the meat from the tail and break it up
  5. Put the meat aside in a bowl in the refrigerator
  6. When the pork has finished cooking remove it from the oven and set it on absorbent paper to drain the free liquid fat
  7. Start to stir-fry the kale coleslaw and sliced bird’s eye chillies
  8. When the cabbage has softened add the horseradish cream and sour cream and stir through
  9. Turn the heat off and keep stirring through the horseradish cream and sour cream
  10. Take the pan off the stove and set aside for a few minutes
  11. While the stir-fry is cooling cut the pork rashers into small pieces
  12. Add the Moreton Bay Bug meat to the stir-fry and mix through
  13. Add the stir-fry and bug meat to bowls and top with the pork rasher meat
  14. Serve with chopsticks
Recipe Notes

I routinely apply 500 Calories to every recipe because I don’t know the real Calorie count.

 

Photographs

This is a gallery, click on one photograph and scroll through all the photographs.

Questions and answers

Where are Moreton Bay Bugs found?

Moreton Bay Bugs are found in the Indian and Pacific oceans. They are known as the slipper lobster as well as the flathead lobster. The scientific name is Thenus orientalis.

Do Moreton Bay Bugs taste better than other seafood?

Well, I prefer Top End Mud Crab and North Sea King crab, but I reckon Moreton Bay Bugs which are fresh are as good as if not better than most prawns. I’d eat fresh oysters over bugs as well as fresh scallops.

What is it with the kale coleslaw?

It’s easily available in the supermarket, it’s colourful, it tastes good and it’s high in fibre. It also stir-fries really well and absorbs strong flavours nicely.

Have you ever combined pork and seafood?

Let me know in the comments below.

 

How to make something quick and easy with Coles pulled pork

How to make something quick and easy with Coles pulled pork
Yummy Lummy

 
 
00:00 / 00:03:28
 
1X
 

How to make something quick and easy with Coles pulled pork

Normally making something with pulled pork requires hours of slow cooking. This Coles product relieves you of that time burden. Coupled with some vegetables from the refrigerator and some sauces you can make a quick and easy meal. I’ve used it before and enjoyed it.

Jump to RecipePhotos Questions

Packet of Coles pulled pork

Coles pulled pork

Recipe

Spicy Coles pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage

Spicy Coles pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
Here's a quick and easy meal made with Coles pulled pork
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 2
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • Coles pulled pork
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet corn on the cob
  • Spring onions sliced
  • Parsley
  • Sriracha sauce
  • Black bean sauce
  • Whisky
  • Pouring cream
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Black pepper
  • Chilli flakes
Instructions
  1. Cook the Coles pulled pork in the microwave oven for five minutes and then pull your meat
  2. Cook the sweet corn in the microwave oven for five minutes and strip from the cob
  3. Cut the cabbage into a fine shred
  4. Sauté Coles the pulled pork in a frying pan
    Coles pulled pork
  5. Add the corn and cabbage and stir-fry
  6. Add everything else except for the cream and cook until all the liquid has reduced and the meat starts to catch the bottom of the pan
  7. Add the cream and cook through until it too is reduced
  8. Serve with a parsley garnish
Recipe Notes

I have no idea how many Calories in a serve. I use 500 Calories as my standard default number.

 

Photographs

Pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage in the frying pan

Coles pulled pork

The finished product

Coles pulled pork
Hot and spicy pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage

Questions and answers

Don’t you feel like a fraud cooking with ready-made products?

Not at all. Life’s too short. This product is convenient and it tastes fine. If it didn’t taste any good I wouldn’t use it.

Are you sponsored by Coles?

No, Yummy Lummy has no sponsors.

Do you want to be sponsored?

I wouldn’t mind being given products to review. I’d always declare of course if I was given something for free.

Cooking meals for one on Facebook

It’s been a while since I plugged the Facebook group Cooking meals for one. If you’d like to join please send me a message via Facebook and I’ll hook you up. We have a few regular members who contribute daily and it’s nice to see what other people cook and get some inspiration from their creations.

If you live alone or if you cook for maybe one other person, feel free to join our group.

How is my weight loss going?

You may have noticed over the last few posts that the food is low carb. I’m trying to lose some weight. I started at 87 kg and after about seven weeks, I’m down to 82 kg. My aim is to get well below 80 kg if I can. I’d love your encouragement to keep going.

Coles leftover pulled pork nachos

 

Crispy pork crackling may help smarten kids

Crispy pork crackling may help smarten kids
Yummy Lummy

 
 
00:00 / 00:02:53
 
1X
 

Crispy pork crackling may help smarten kids

Crispy pork crackling may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you are pregnant but this week it was salty goodness that had me thinking. I need to back up a bit to explain.

Jump to RecipePhotos Q&A

Iodine deficiency

This post does have a recipe I promise you but it is really written to get any readers who may be pregnant or who are thinking about having children to be very aware of the role of iodine in the intellectual development of children. The role of iodine is important from the time of conception when a zygote forms and an embryo implants, through the gestation and then in the early life as a baby and infant.

This post isn’t a physiology lesson but I’d appreciate if you look up the role of iodine and perhaps visit my other blog where I describe a lecture I attended last week on iodine deficiency and the ramifications for the intellectual development of young Australians. The bottom line is that iodine supplementation during pregnancy is something to seriously consider.

Iodised salt

Sources of iodine include dairy products (albeit not as much as previously [see my other blog about that]), bread (because most bread in Australia is made with iodised salt), and iodised salt.

Obviously, too much salt is a problem for heart health, but if you need to add salt, use iodised salt and avoid fancy new age crap like seas salt and rock salt that offer no additional health benefits and may, in fact, be noxious to your health. Iodised table and cooking salt are also usually cheaper.

Saxa iodised table salt

This is not an advertisement for the Saxa brand

crispy pork crackling iodised salt

Recipe

Crispy pork crackling

Crispy pork crackling
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 5 mins
 
This is a never fail recipe for getting crispy crunchy pork crackling.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • Pork rashers
  • Iodised salt
  • Chilli flakes
  • Sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Cut the skin off each rasher and lay the skin on some baking paper on a thin oven tray.
  2. Sprinkle liberally with iodised table salt
    crispy pork crackling iodised salt
  3. Place into an oven at 200 °C/400 °F for one hour
  4. Place the skinless rashers into a frying pan lined with baking paper
  5. Sprinkle on the meat some sesame seeds and chilli flakes
  6. Place into an oven at 200 °C/400 °F for one hour
  7. When cooked, pull out the rasher meat and place onto absorbent paper and allow to cool a little. Do the same for the crackling too.
  8. Cut the rashers into small bite-sized chunks
  9. Serve on a plate with the crackling
  10. Eat with chopsticks and serve with a dipping sauce. Rick and Morty's Sichuan Teriyaki dipping sauce would work a charm here.
Recipe Notes

You may want to eat this with a cup of tea. It's really quite fatty.

Please note I never check the energy values. I use 500 Calories as my default. 

 

Photograph

The finished product

Crispy pork crackling. This would go well with my Rick and Morty Sichuan Dipping Sauce.

crispy pork crackling iodised salt
Crackling and pork

Questions and answers

What sort of salt do you normally buy?

I usually buy iodised table salt. I have also bought sea salt and rock salt. I reckon the only good use for rock salt is when making something like salted caramel when you want a concentrated hit of salt surrounded by sweetness.

What do you think of Himalayan rock salt?

After listening to Prof. Eastman the other night I’ll never buy it again. He reckons the murky colour is due to impurities like heavy metals which may be noxious to human health. I’ll probably also avoid Murray River salt too for the same reason. I mean have to see the crap in the Murray River.

Are you going to tell your daughters to supplement with iodine when they become pregnant?

Of course, I want bright grandchildren, not idiots.

Podcasting

I’m thinking of starting a cooking podcast. I’m happy to receive suggestions.