Food photography

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Pork and beef cheese pie

A cheese pie with a lot of pork and beef

Cheese pie, hey! Normally I know well in advance what I’ll be cooking on a Saturday. Today, however, was different. I hadn’t given much thought to Saturday dinner during the week. I know right. Shock! Horror!

When I saw the pork and beef mince in the meat section of Coles this morning I figured I’d use it sometime during the week. By the time, I got back to the apartment, I still had no idea what I was going to cook. It took a walk around Lake Ginninderra for me to get my head around what I was going to put together.

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the side bar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

By subscribing you’ll receive a personalised e-mail from me and from time to time, apart from the blog post I’ll share something new, like my ideas for a cook book sometime this year.

Preparing tonight’s dinner

Fortunately, I had most of the ingredients I needed for this somewhat unusual cheese pie.

What you will need to put this meal for one together

  • 500 grams of pork and beef mince
  • A few good splashes of Worcestershire sauce
  • Two handfuls of grated Coon cheese
  • A small handful of sliced spring onion
  • One small sliced red chilli
  • One small sliced jalapeño pepper
  • Half a handful of dried chilli flakes
  • Two good splashes of cheap olive oil
  • Three pieces of bread
  • Seven slices of smoked cheese
  • Two handful of fried shallots
  • One handful of panko breadcrumbs
  • One small packet of baby spinach leaves
  • Two sliced tomatoes

How to put all this together

  1. It’s always best to get your meat to room temperature before cooking it, so pull out the mince (ground meat for my friends in North America) and let it get to room temperature
  2. In the mince add a splash of the cheap olive oil, a few good splashes of Worcestershire sauce, a handful of grated Coon cheese, half the spring onions, half the chillies and jalapeño pepper, the chilli flakes and a handful of fried shallots
  3. Mix it all together and as my Mum says, whack your pork to get the muscle fibres tender
  4. Allow the mince and the stuff you mixed into it to rest while you get everything else prepared
  5. In the bottom of a stainless-steel frying pan or any other oven safe container lay out the bread and then lay on some of the smoked cheese
  6. Splash some oil around to ensure you have a base with a ‘fried bread’ texture
  7. Add the meat mix on top and spread it out
  8. Cover the meat with the spinach leaves
  9. Lay over the spinach leaves the slices of tomato
  10. Next comes the remainder of the spring onions, chilli and jalapeño pepper
  11. The final layer on top if the combined panko bread crumbs, fried shallots and the last of the grated Coon cheese
  12. I splashed a little more of the cheap olive oil on top before putting it all into a moderate oven set at 150 °C (300 °F) for one hour
  13. When it’s ready allow it to cool and serve with vegetables or eat on its own, whatever you fancy really

How did the cheese pie taste?

It was smoky, cheesy, spicy, and crispy. I really liked it. There’s enough left over for meals during the week.

Spicy and crispy pork and beef cheese pie with vegetables Cheese pie Gary Lum
Spicy and crispy pork and beef cheese pie with vegetables [click on the photo for a better view]

Final thoughts

Making up meals like this is fun. Just put your imagination to it and see what happens.  

If you want to see what I got up to today, check out this link

Sunshine Blogger Award

Overnight, my friend Jennifer who writes the blog Little Monster Girl, nominated me for a blogging award, viz., the Sunshine Blogger Award. 

I’m not sure if I’ll get to nominating other bloggers and generating 11 questions, but here are Jennifer’s questions and my answers.

How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are?

Old enough

What is your favourite holiday that you celebrate?

Australia Day, 26 January. It’s a controversial day for Indigenous Australians, but it’s important to me. I also enjoy eating food that is typically Australian on Australia Day.

What’s something you know you do differently than most people?

I cook congee or jook in a slow cooker rather than a pressure cooker or simmering it on a stove in a big pot.

What talent or skill would you most like to have?

I would love to be able to sing.

You have to fight off a monster with whatever is to your left. What is it?

My iPhone. I use the Star Wars light sabre app to scare the monster. 

What’s your favourite meal?

My mother’s wonton soup.

Let’s play “Our Town”–You have died and get to relive one day. What day?

Body surfing perfect waves on the sunshine coast, Queensland.

If the average human life span was 40 years, how would you live/have lived your life differently?

I would have travelled and done some of my speciality training overseas and I would have made time to see various parts of the world. 

You can witness any historic event of your choice. Which one?

The Japanese surrender on the USS Missouri. 

Who is your hero?

My former boss, Dr Len Notaras, AM. 

What do you order your first time at a restaurant that you have never been to before?

Oysters natural with a little lime juice and salt if the restaurant has it.  

Stop Press: Leftovers

Pork and beef meatloaf cheese pie with bacon and red chilli Gary Lum
Pork and beef meatloaf cheese pie with bacon and red chilli | Sunday night leftovers [Click on the photo for a better view]

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

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Cooking corn in another way

Cooking corn inside a chook is a new one for me

Cooking corn isn’t difficult, especially if it’s fresh. I posted about cooking a cob in aluminium foil some weeks ago.

Tonight, I tried cooking corn in another way and using a similar concept. This time instead of keeping the husk on and wrapping it in foil, I inserted the corn into a chicken’s main body cavity and protected the exposed portion with some aluminium foil.

I also made a video of how I prepared the chicken and the sweet corn. I apologise if you interpret the video of being suggestive of anything but cooking.

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the sidebar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

By subscribing you’ll receive a personalised e-mail from me and from time to time, apart from the blog post I’ll share something new, like my ideas for a cooking book sometime this year.

Preparing tonight’s dinner

The last two days have seen maximum temperatures in Canberra hit 41 °C. Today it cooled down to 32 °C and this afternoon it cooled right down to 18 °C. It’s ridiculous weather.

I was worried having the oven on may make my living area too hot. It turns out, I needed the oven on to keep warm.

Roast chicken with a cob of corn and a duck fat roasted potato Cooking corn Gary Lum
Roast chicken with a cob of corn and a duck fat roasted potato [click on the photo for a better view]

What you will need to put this meal for one together

  • a whole chicken
  • 1 cob of corn
  • one handful of olive oil
  • a small nob of butter
  • 1 potato
  • a small bunch of broccoli
  • Chilli flakes—dried
  • Sea salt
  • Cracked pepper
  • Paprika

How to put all this together

  1. Cook the potato like I’ve done before with duck fat, I also laid some stale bread on the bottom of the baking tray to absorb the chicken juices
  2. Prepare the chicken by getting it to room temperature and putting it in a baking tray
  3. Pat the chicken dry
  4. Apply some olive oil and rub it into the skin and to the outside of the cob of corn
  5. Insert some tarragon and thyme into the body cavity
  6. Follow this with the cob of corn
  7. Dress the exposed corn with some aluminium foil
  8. Cook in an oven at 180 °C for 90 minutes
  9. Allow the chicken to rest for 30 minutes
  10. Plate up with some broccoli

How did it taste?

The corn was well cooked and juicy. The chicken was moist and tender. I have enough leftover for lunch at work.

Roast chicken Maryland with roast corn and potato with broccoli https://youtu.be/TvFABegDKMc cooking corn Gary Lum
Roast chicken Maryland with roast corn and potato with broccoli https://youtu.be/TvFABegDKMc [click on the photo for a better view]

Final thoughts

I think it’s easier to cook corn in its husk in aluminium foil. There is no real need to cook a whole chook all the time. I prefer to cook chicken pieces.

Jalapeño spam and prawn curry

Jalapeño spam is a lovely spicy taste sensation

Jalapeño spam is a variation of my favourite tinned meat. When you slice through a brick of Jalapeño spam you come across small pieces of diced Jalapeño pepper.

So far I’ve had a couple of sandwiches with a thick wodge of Jalapeño spam either oven baked and fried, or pan fried in a toasted sandwich.

Guess what is covered in Coon cheese with broccoli? Jalapeño spam Gary Lum
Guess what is covered in Coon cheese with broccoli? [click on the photo for a better view]
Saturday #Canberra #heatwave Jalapeño @SPAMbrand @KFCAustralia coleslaw and #cooncheese #toastie Jalapeño spam Gary Lum
Saturday #Canberra #heatwave Jalapeño @SPAMbrand @KFCAustralia coleslaw and #cooncheese #toastie [click on the photo for a better view]
Tonight, I thought I may combine some spam with prawns in a ramen noodle curry.

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the sidebar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

By subscribing you’ll receive a personalised e-mail from me and from time to time, apart from the blog post I’ll share something new, like my ideas for a cookbook sometime this year.

Preparing tonight’s dinner

Today Canberra experienced another 41 °C maximum temperature. To avoid dehydration and heat stroke I’ve stayed inside and not done terribly much. I did go grocery shopping this morning and bought some raw prawns.

Spam, coconut cream and duck fat Jalapeño spam Gary Lum
Spam, coconut cream and duck fat [click on the photo for a better view]

What you will need to put this meal for one together

  • Jalapeño spam—diced
  • Raw prawns that have been peeled
  • Instant noodles
  • Coconut cream
  • Red onions—sliced
  • Thai red curry paste
  • Red chillies—sliced
  • Jalapeño peppers—sliced
  • Chilli flakes—dried
  • Tomato—quartered (I wish this was a sweet fresh tomato)
  • Peas
  • Corn
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Lime zest and lime juice
  • Mint

How to put all this together

  1. Cook the noodles in boiling water
  2. Fry off the spam and onions until they start to caramelise and then add the tomato
  3. To the spam and onions add the peas, corn, broccoli, carrots and potatoes and keep stirring while frying
  4. As the vegetables begin to soften add a couple of tablespoons of the Thai red curry paste and stir through the cooking food
  5. Once the curry paste has been well incorporated add the cooked noodles and stir everything through getting the curry paste mixed in with the noodles
  6. Open the tin of coconut cream and add it while stirring
  7. Bring the coconut cream to a slow gentle simmer and the red chillies, jalapeño peppers and chilli flakes
  8. Add the juice of one lime
  9. Hopefully, while the coconut cream simmers it reduces in volume slightly
  10. At this point add the prawns and let them cook gently and be careful not to overcook them
  11. Put everything into a bowl and garnish with lime zest and mint

How did it taste?

I liked it. What’s not to like, though? My favourite tinned meats are spam and corned beef. This jalapeño spam is very nice.

A like hot and spicy meals on hot days and today was a very hot day. It was worth making.

Saturday #Canberra #heatwave Jalapeño @SPAMbrand and prawn red curry Jalapeño spam Gary Lum
Saturday #Canberra #heatwave Jalapeño @SPAMbrand and prawn red curry [for a better view click on the photo]

Final thoughts

If you’re not anti-spam, I reckon you should give this jalapeño version a go. If you do, please let me know what you think. 

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

Sweet sweet tomatoes

Fresh sweet tomatoes are so much better than store bought

So, I come back from Delhi and a work friend gives me a bag of her fresh sweet tomatoes.

It’s so true that fresh is always best. These little tomatoes were so sweet and crisp and tasty. Last night I cooked them with my salmon and leftover prawn curry.

Salmon with curry prawns with pearl barley couscous and brown rice with white quinoa Sweet tomatoes Gary Lum
Salmon with curry prawns with pearl barley couscous and brown rice with white quinoa [click for a better view]
Tonight, I had them with crispy skin curry chilli salmon and a chilli jalapeño salad with fried shallots and lime zest. 

Crispy skin curry chilli salmon with fresh tomatoes, and a chilli jalapeño salad with fried shallots and lime zest. sweet tomatoes Gary Lum
Crispy skin curry chilli salmon with fresh tomatoes, and a chilli jalapeño salad with fried shallots and lime zest. [click on the photo for a better view]

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the sidebar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

Preparing tonight’s dinner

I got home from work and immediately started on the salad. In a metal bowl, I added some chopped iceberg lettuce, fried shallots, sliced spring onions, sliced red onion, red chillies, jalapeño peppers, the halved tomatoes, lime zest and some chunks of cream cheese.  

With the salad done I tossed some flour, curry powder and chilli flakes into the plastic bag with the salmon and shook it up to coat the salmon.

I heated up a small iron-based frying pan in my portable induction hob and sprayed it will a little olive oil. The salmon was tossed skin side down into the frying pan. The hot pan and the flour/curry coating got it nice and crispy. The salmon was flipped over when it was ready and a little butter was added. Don’t overcook the fish!

Juice from the lime, the hot butter and oil plus a little salt and maple syrup was used to dress the salad.

How did it taste?

My experience in India has convinced me that I need to add more spices to my food. Tonight, there were chilli flakes, curry powder, red chillies and jalapeño peppers.

The stand out component were the sweet tomatoes. They just popped. The salmon was very good too. Because avocado is so expensive now, I didn’t have any, so that’s where the cream cheese came into play. It worked well to give that smooth mouth feel.

Final thoughts

If you can get your hands on or your mouth around some fresh sweet tomatoes, do it. It’s well worth the effort.

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

 

My alimentary tract has come alive with the smells, sights and sounds of Delhi

How much of my alimentary tract?

All my alimentary tract! I’ve just returned from eight nights away from Canberra, five of which were spent in Delhi, India. I was participating in a World Health Organization meeting on poliovirus containment.

One of the highlights, apart from the meeting, was the food. Every meal was filled with flavourful spices from all parts of India.

Twitter embed for alimentary tract alive tweet

Facebook embed for alimentary tract alive tweet

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the sidebar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

Breakfasts

I ate breakfasts in the hotel and each morning I had an omelette with bacon and most days spicy baked beans. I also added a few Indian treats including the different types of bread.  

Cheese omelet with baked beans and bacon breakfast at The Imperial alimentary tract Gary Lum
Cheese omelette with baked beans and bacon breakfast at The Imperial
Tuesday breakfast at The Imperial Hotel. A little more adventurous with some local bread. alimentary tract Gary Lum
Tuesday breakfast at The Imperial Hotel. A little more adventurous with some local bread.
Is it wrong to have lovely spicy baked beans with my poori along with a cheese omelet and bacon? alimentary tract Gary Lum
Is it wrong to have lovely spicy baked beans with my poori along with a cheese omelette and bacon?
The potato dumpling went well with the spicy baked beans as well as the cheesy omelet and bacon alimentary tract Gary Lum
The potato dumpling went well with the spicy baked beans as well as the cheesy omelette and bacon
Croissant and doughnut alimentary tract Gary Lum
Croissant and doughnut
TGIF my last breakfast. Aloo Bhaji on paratha meets my spicy baked beans, cheese and chilli 🌶 omelette with bacon alimentary tract Gary Lum
TGIF my last breakfast. Aloo Bhaji on paratha meets my spicy baked beans, cheese and chilli 🌶 omelette with bacon

Lunches

Each day I tried something different and yet each day there were elements that were the same, like pappadums. The main regions with distinctive flavours are the north, south and east.  

Northern Indian food alimentary tract Gary Lum
Northern Indian food
Eastern Indian curry lunch alimentary tract Gary Lum
Eastern Indian curry lunch
Southern Indian lunch Imperial Hotel alimentary tract Gary Lum
Southern Indian lunch Imperial Hotel
French chicken cassoulet and crepe Florentine with mutton masala is such a good flavour combination alimentary tract Gary Lum
French chicken cassoulet and crepe Florentine with mutton masala is such a good flavour combination
Chocolate mousse and vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce alimentary tract Gary Lum
Chocolate mousse and vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce
Friday lunch Imperial Hotel, chicken, cauliflower, lamb and paratha alimentary tract Gary Lum
Friday lunch Imperial Hotel, chicken, cauliflower, lamb and paratha

Dinners

Monday night was a buffet with a northern touch.

Northern Indian dinner at The Imperial Hotel | The big green balls were a bit funky, everything else was fantastic. alimentary tract Gary Lum
Northern Indian dinner at The Imperial Hotel | The big green balls were a bit funky, everything else was fantastic.

Tuesday night I had a Thai duck curry.

Kaeng Phed Ped Yang | Roasted duck cooked in Thai red curry garnished with pineapple and rambutan | Spice Route Restaurant alimentary tract Gary Lum
Kaeng Phed Ped Yang | Roasted duck cooked in Thai red curry garnished with pineapple and rambutan | Spice Route Restaurant

On Wednesday night, I went out with some WHO colleagues and we went to Barbecue Nation. It was a barbeque pit with hot coals placed in the middle of the table with spicy meat on metal skewers cooked as you want it.

Barbecue Nation, Delhi. Prawns, Chicken and Fish. alimentary tract Gary Lum
Barbeque Nation, Delhi. Prawns, Chicken and Fish.

Thursday night was my last night staying at the Imperial Hotel, and I ate at Daniell’s Tavern. I enjoyed Burra memsahib’s favourite pepper mutton from Coorg. It was mutton tossed in spicy marsala with lots and lots of black pepper corns. 

My mouth is so happy with Burra memsahib's favourite pepper mutton from Coorg. Mutton tossed in spicy marsala. Sorry about poor light. alimentary tract Gary Lum
My mouth is so happy with Burra memsahib’s favourite pepper mutton from Coorg. Mutton tossed in spicy marsala. Sorry about poor light.
Garlic naan alimentary tract Gary Lum
Garlic naan

Would I return?

Sure, if I need to return to work there, of course, I would. Would I go to Delhi for a holiday? I wouldn’t in winter, maybe summer. I’d probably want to explore the other regions.

My reason for not returning in winter is not so much the cold, it wasn’t. It was the very low humidity. My skin became a mess. I was forever applying moisturiser and it didn’t feel like anything would help. It was very uncomfortable.

Final thoughts on eating in Delhi

I titled this post “My alimentary tract has come alive with the smells, sights and sounds of Delhi”. Every mouthful of food was like having a party in my mouth. Some meals were spicier than others. The food from the south seemed to be hotter and more intense. The food from the east seemed to be milder. Each meal though was very nice. I didn’t go much for the desserts, I was eating so much rice, I don’t think I needed any more carbohydrates.

The good news is I didn’t feel unwell at all and there were no episodes of gastroenteritis. That said, there was an awful lot of gurgling noises from my bowels. Some nights it was almost musical.

The food is also very colourful. It was like art on a plate or in a bowl. The only meal I had that didn’t look pretty was my favourite meal, the pepper mutton. Best meal but nothing to look at.

In terms of smells, each dish had amazing aromas, and given the title of this blog post, the fragrant aromas passed completely through my alimentary tract. I suppose I shouldn’t write anything more about that.

Another surprising thing!

Apart from my iPhone, I didn’t bring a camera. You can tell the images are not as sharp. My iPhone photography suffers from motion blur, especially on aeroplanes. 

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

Travelling from Canberra to Delhi

Why am I going to Delhi?

I’m currently travelling to Delhi for work. Poliovirus containment is a part of what I do at work. The World Health Organization’s global effort to eradicate polio (the disease, as opposed to containing poliovirus, the microorganism that causes polio) also includes poliovirus containment. The distinction is important, it’s important to eradicate the disease and contain the ætiological agent.

Australia has been polio-free for decades and we’re well advanced in poliovirus containment.


Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the sidebar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).


What preparation is needed?

Spending time in Delhi had me thinking about potential travel-related health problems I might encounter. In addition, if you visit the smart traveller site hosted by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, you’ll see there are some important statements about India.

It’s important to speak with a travel doctor, even for work-related travel. That’s what I did. January and February are low-risk times in terms of mosquito-borne infections, especially if I’m mainly going to be in a building with other health professionals. It’s winter so I’ll be in long sleeves and trousers the whole time.

Eating street food isn’t on the agenda because I won’t have an opportunity. I arrived late the night before the meeting and the schedule is packed for all the days I’m in Delhi.

Eating cooked hotel food is part of my staying healthy plan. I have a colleague who is Indian and she returns to the northern parts regularly to visit family and she told me to eat deep fried food. Exactly the opposite of the nutritional advice she shares with me each Friday at the hospital.

One of the problems that India is experiencing is widespread antimicrobial resistance. So much so, that the usual antimicrobials for diseases like typhoid fever are no longer useful.

Canberra to Sydney

I flew Qantas in a Dash 8. There was a snack. It was a little container of a savoury dip and biscuits along with a small piece of apple and coconut cake. I also drank a Bundaberg ginger beer.

Border control at Sydney International Airport

Fortunately, there weren’t a lot of people trying to cross over into the secure zone. For some reason, there was an apparent randomness to queue allocation and while some people went through unhindered after the electronic assessment I was directed to speak with an Australian Border Force officer. He was very friendly and processed my paperwork very quickly.

One poor Englishman though had to say goodbye to his pocket knife. He was remonstrating with security about how other countries let him travel with it but this was to no avail to the private security contractors at Sydney International Airport. 

Dinner

Dinner at the airport was good. I had a caramelised lamb shoulder and chickpeas and then a small deconstructed pavlova.

 

Caramelised lamb shoulder with chickpeas parsley salad and garlic yogurt | Qantas First Class Lounge Delhi Gary Lum
Caramelised lamb shoulder with chickpeas parsley salad and garlic yoghurt | Qantas First Class Lounge [Click for a better view]
Pavlova with cherry nectarines and raspberry | Sydney Airport Qantas First Class Lounge Delhi Gary Lum
Pavlova with cherry nectarines and raspberry | Sydney Airport Qantas First Class Lounge [click for a better view]

Sydney to Kuala Lumpur

I flew Malaysia Airlines on MH140. The flight left on time and soon after take-off, we enjoyed some Malaysian satay, some smoked salmon and then a piece of beef. I also had a piece of cheesecake.

MH140 Malaysian Satay Delhi Gary Lum
MH140 Malaysian Satay

MH140 Smoked salmon entree Delhi Gary Lum
MH140 Smoked salmon entree [click for a better view]
MH140 Beef main course Delhi Gary Lum
MH140 Beef main course [click for a better view]
MH140 Cheesecake dessert Delhi Gary Lum
MH140 Cheesecake dessert [Click for a better view]
The flight was turbulent most of the way and it got worse over the Top End and as we approached Malaysia. I really didn’t sleep. I deliberately didn’t try to stimulate myself with my iPad or iPhone. I’d downloaded a heap of podcasts and I had a couple of books but I basically tried to keep my eyes closed.

The flight was turbulent enough that breakfast wasn’t served. The flight landed at Kuala Lumpur International Airport at about 3.40 am. It was dark but warm (26 °C).

Kuala Lumpur for ten hours

My next flight, MH190 didn’t leave KUL until 4 pm in the afternoon I spent a pleasant day in the airport reading work papers and walking around. Free Wi-Fi is marvellous. I’m so grateful I brought an ‘English’ power adapter as well as the Type C adaptor for India.

Kuala Lumpur to Delhi

MH190 left Kuala Lumpur on time and the flight arrive in Delhi a little early. It was a comfortable flight with a little turbulence on approach to Delhi.

Me on board MH190 Delhi Gary Lum
Me on board MH190

Again, the food started with some satay followed by a small salad and then a round of beef with vegetables. The beef was nice. Not very tender, but it had a nice flavour.

Malaysia Airlines MH190 satay Delhi Gary Lum
Malaysia Airlines MH190 satay [click for a better view]
Malaysia Airlines MH190 Grouper and vegetables Delhi Gary Lum
Malaysia Airlines MH190 Grouper and vegetables [click for a better view]

First impressions of Delhi

Getting off the aeroplane was trouble-free. I’d packed three small bags and had no check in luggage so I didn’t have to wait at a carousel hoping that my bags hadn’t got lost. Delhi airport immigration area has a specific line for diplomats and official passport holders. I got straight in and out in less than one minute. My best experience ever.

As I moved through I could see long lines of people wanting to buy rupee. I’d been told I could get by with my personal credit card so I elected not to wait in line.

WHO takes personal security very seriously so whenever a delegate lands there is someone to meet them and arrange transport to the hotel. This was no different and it worked well.

India celebrated republic day on 26 January, the same date as Australia day. As I drove past all the government buildings they were lit up beautifully in white light bulbs.

The Imperial Hotel

The meeting is at the Imperial Hotel in the middle of New Delhi. It’s an older building, built in the early 1900s in an Art Deco style. It’s very comfortable.

Room 265 The Imperial. After a long flight a bed is good. Delhi Gary Lum
Room 265 The Imperial. After a long flight a bed is good. [click for a better view]
The food in the hotel restaurants has been very nice. You’ll see examples in my social media feeds.

I’ll catch you later.

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

Food for Australia Day 2017

What did I eat on Australia Day 2017?

Before I get to today, I should mention what I did last night. I left work thinking about Australia Day 2017 and what it means for me. There were also thoughts about the chicken wings I had in the refrigerator.

I decided to go with something that would fill me with saturated fat. I had a bread roll which I split and put on the bottom of a large frying pan. On this, I spread some Vegemite and then added some grated Coon cheese. On top of this typically Australian combination, I put my chicken wings and added some more grated Coon cheese.

Cheesy chicken wings with vegemite and Coon cheese on 'fried' bread Australia Day 2017 Gary Lum
Cheesy chicken wings with vegemite and Coon cheese on ‘fried’ bread {click for a better view]

Breakfast

Overnight I had some weird dreams and as I woke from sleep I pondered breakfast. I decided I’d have something green and gold for Australia Day 2017, so I went with a piece of toast slathered in golden butter, covered in Vegemite and topped with a slice of Coon cheese. To this, I added a fried egg with a golden yolk and garnished with green spring onions. I put this on a green plate.

Australia day Vegemite and melted Coon cheese on toast with a fried egg Australia Day 2017 Gary Lum
Australia day Vegemite and melted Coon cheese on toast with a fried egg [click for a better view]

Lunch

For Australia Day 2017 lunch I had some lime and pepper chips, a Queensland mango and some lime green lime juice in a glass of water.

Happy Australia day 🇦🇺🌏 My idea of green and gold! Queensland mangoes and lime Australia Day 2017 Gary Lum
Happy Australia day 🇦🇺🌏 My idea of green and gold! Queensland mangoes and lime [click for a bigger view]

Favourite things about Australia

Did you know my favourite state is Queensland and my favourite territory is the Northern Territory of Australia?

Dinner

There is a bit of a commercial tradition for lamb, to be featured so I went with a rolled boneless lamb shoulder that was slowly cooked in the oven at 150 °C (302 °F) for 2½ hours covered with aluminium foil and then 30 minutes uncovered. I also cooked a couple of spuds and served it with some peas and corn for a bit of green and gold!

 

 

Australia Day Lamb shoulder roll with potatoes ready for the oven Australia Day 2017 Gary Lum
Australia Day Lamb shoulder roll with potatoes ready for the oven [click for a bigger view]
Australia day 🇦🇺🌏 Roast lamb shoulder with potato, pearl barley couscous and gravy Australia Day 2017 Gary Lum
Australia day 🇦🇺🌏 Roast lamb shoulder with potato, pearl barley couscous and gravy [click for a bigger view]

What did I do on Australia Day 2017?

This morning I went for a walk around Lake Ginninderra and had a coffee.

Lake Ginninderra Australia Day 2017 Gary Lum
Lake Ginninderra [click for a bigger view]
Then I got stuck into writing and recording a couple of podcast shows for next week.

What did you eat on Australia Day 2017?

Hopefully, you had a good day off if you’re here in Australia. If you live outside of Australia, I hope you had a good Republic Day if you’re Indian and a great 26 January for everyone else.

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
Then there is also a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

Curry prawns with pork beef mince balls

Curry prawns with pork beef mince balls for Sunday tea

Curry prawns were on my mind today after I realised, that last night when I cooked the scotch fillet steak, I forgot to add the prawns for a surf and turf steak sandwich.

I had some pork and beef mince (ground meat) in the refrigerator and I knew I could make enough to have leftovers for lunch at work this week.

 

 

 

What you need to make this meal

  • Raw peeled prawns (bought from Coles)
  • Pork/beef mince (500 g bought from Coles)
  • Thai red curry paste (2 tablespoons)
  • Coconut cream (1 × 375 mL tin)
  • Spring onions (1 small handful)
  • Onion (1 onion, sliced)
  • Peas, Corn and Capsicum (frozen, 2 small handfuls)
  • Lime zest and juice (1 lime)
  • Red quinoa and brown rice (1 packet, 250 g)
  • Tomato (1, diced)
  • Red chilli (1, sliced)
  • Jalapeño pepper (1, sliced)

How do you put it all together?

Mould the pork beef mince into small balls just bigger than human testicles (sorry, podcasting medical fun facts has got me confused, this is a cooking blog isn’t it?)

If you’ve never held human testes, mould the balls to a size a little smaller than table tennis (ping pong) balls.

Pork beef meat balls curry prawns Gary Lum
Pork beef meat balls [Click on the photograph for a full view]
Set the meaty balls aside

Get out a nice big wok

Cook the packet quinoa rice in the microwave oven for 90 seconds on high

Get the wok nice and hot

Add a little vegetable oil to your hot wok

Stir fry the onion, some of the spring onion and if you want it some garlic and ginger

Slowly and carefully add the balls to the wok and brown them off

Once the balls are mostly cooked through add the curry paste and get everything nicely covered in the paste’s flavours

Capsicum, Corn, Ginger, Jalapeño peppers, Marmalade, Onion, Peas, Red chillies, Spring onion, Tomatoes curry prawns Gary Lum
Capsicum, Corn, Ginger, Jalapeño peppers, Marmalade, Onion, Peas, Red chillies, Spring onion, Tomatoes [Click on the photo for a full view]
Add the following ingredients in this order

  1. chilli, jalapeño and tomato and stir,
  2. quinoa rice and stir everything thoroughly,
  3. the tin of coconut cream and bring the wok to a very gentle simmer,
  4. lime zest and lime juice,
  5. Peas, Corn and Capsicum and stir in, and
  6. prawns and keep stirring until they are cooked

Turn off the heat and transfer the curry to a bowl and garnish with the rest of the spring onions

Put the remainder of the curry into a plastic container and put it into the refrigerator

So how did it turn out?

Let me know what you think from the photograph.

Red curry prawns with pork beef meatballs with red quinoa and brown rice in coconut cream Gary Lum
Red curry prawns with pork beef meatballs with red quinoa and brown rice in coconut cream [Click on the photograph for a full image view]
The curry had a nice limey lummy tang with the spiciness of the curry and chillies.

The coconut cream nicely infused the meaty balls and prawns too.

 

All that said, tomorrow I’m fearing the burning ring of fire 
 

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

Dijon mustard and chives crusted scotch fillet steak

Scotch fillet steak on a Saturday night is even better if it’s a steak sandwich

I watched a Nicko’s Kitchen video on YouTube recently on how to cook a perfect scotch fillet steak. My technique is slightly different in that I follow the Heston Blumenthal method of rapid flipping every fifteen to twenty seconds.

 

Anyway, I wanted a steak sandwich for dinner. I liked the way Nicko crusted his steak by using Dijon mustard and chopped chives. It looked very pretty. It also added a nice taste too. 

What you’ll need

Scotch fillet steak

Salt

Olive oil

Butter

Thyme

Chives

Dijon mustard

Cracked pepper

Lettuce

Tomato

Swiss cheese slices

Bread roll

Here’s what you do

Slice the bread roll into halves

Apply some Dijon mustard to the inside of each half

Add a slice of Swiss cheese

Put the bread under a grill for a few minutes to slightly melt the cheese

Remove some lettuce leaves and wash them

Slice the tomato and allow it to rest on some paper towel

Apple some pepper to one side of the tomato

The steak should have been in the refrigerator for about half a day at least uncovered

Take the steak out at least an hour before you’re ready to cook to get it to room temperature

Rub some olive oil all over the steak

Season the steak with salt

Get a pan smoking hot

Put the steak in the pan and flip every 15 to 20 seconds and cook until you like it

I like my steak rare

Add some thyme and a bit of butter and allow the butter to melt and the thyme to flavour the meat

Let the steak rest for at least 5 minutes

Coat one side of the steak with Dijon Mustard

Flip the steak over onto a plate of chopped chives and coat the steak

Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard Gary Lum
Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard [Click on the photograph for a full view]
Slice into the desired thickness

Prepare the steak sandwich with the bread roll and melted cheese

Enjoy a nice juicy steak sandwich

Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard sandwich Gary Lum
Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard sandwich [Click on the photo for a full view]

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.