RY0003 Garlic and anchovy baked beans chicken maryland with crispy balsamic Brussels sprouts

RY0003 Garlic and anchovy baked beans chicken maryland with crispy balsamic Brussels sprouts
Random Yummy

 
 
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You can connect with me via InstagramFacebook, and Twitter.

This is a photograph of my Wednesday dinner. Garlic and anchovy baked beans chicken maryland with crispy balsamic Brussels sprouts.

Tonight’s show notes are at http://yummylummy.com/RY0003

Catch you next time on the Random Yummy.

Links

Heinz baked beans

Coon cheese

MEATER

MEATER review

Roger Stowell and baked beans

RY0002 Coon cheese® omelet with sesame and poppy seeds

RY0002 Coon cheese® omelet with sesame and poppy seeds
Random Yummy

 
 
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Show notes for this episode at https://YummyLummy.com/RY0002

Coon cheese®️

YouTube a video

If you think others would like this please share the podcast with your friends.

You can connect with me via InstagramFacebook, and Twitter.

Catch you next time on the Random Yummy.

This is a photograph of my Coon cheese® omelet with sesame and poppy seeds. The photograph is in landscape orientation.

This is a photograph of my Coon cheese® omelet with sesame and poppy seeds. The photograph is in portrait orientation for Pinterest.

Here’s the YouTube video

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RY0001 Crispy Balsamic Brussels sprouts with Spam and fennel salad

RY0001 Crispy Balsamic Brussels sprouts with Spam and fennel salad
Random Yummy

 
 
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Crispy Brussels sprouts with balsamic vinegar and Spam.

Show notes here.

Click to subscribe in the Apple Podcasts store
This is the logo for Stitcher. Clicking on this will take you to the Yummy Lummy podcast on Stitcher.
Clicking on this will take you to the Yummy Lummy podcast on Stitcher.

This is a photograph of my crispy Balsamic Brussels sprouts with Spam and spicy limey fennel salad 💚. The photo is quite colourful and shows the nice and crispy Brussels sprouts. The photo is in portrait orientation for Pinterest.

Sous Vide Everything

T-Roy

Crispy Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic Goji Berry Apple Gastrique.

Always use iodised salt

 

This is a photograph of my crispy Balsamic Brussels sprouts with Spam and spicy limey fennel salad 💚. The photo is quite colourful and shows the nice and crispy Brussels sprouts.

Doing it again with baked salmon and creamy Brussels sprouts

The ultimate Brussels sprouts and bacon dinner

Baked salmon, Brussels sprouts, bacon and parmesan

 

How to make something quick and easy with Coles pulled pork

How to make something quick and easy with Coles pulled pork
Yummy Lummy

 
 
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How to make something quick and easy with Coles pulled pork

Normally making something with pulled pork requires hours of slow cooking. This Coles product relieves you of that time burden. Coupled with some vegetables from the refrigerator and some sauces you can make a quick and easy meal. I’ve used it before and enjoyed it.

Jump to RecipePhotos Questions

Packet of Coles pulled pork

Coles pulled pork

Recipe

Spicy Coles pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage

Spicy Coles pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
Here's a quick and easy meal made with Coles pulled pork
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 2
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • Coles pulled pork
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet corn on the cob
  • Spring onions sliced
  • Parsley
  • Sriracha sauce
  • Black bean sauce
  • Whisky
  • Pouring cream
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Sesame seeds
  • Black pepper
  • Chilli flakes
Instructions
  1. Cook the Coles pulled pork in the microwave oven for five minutes and then pull your meat
  2. Cook the sweet corn in the microwave oven for five minutes and strip from the cob
  3. Cut the cabbage into a fine shred
  4. Sauté Coles the pulled pork in a frying pan
    Coles pulled pork
  5. Add the corn and cabbage and stir-fry
  6. Add everything else except for the cream and cook until all the liquid has reduced and the meat starts to catch the bottom of the pan
  7. Add the cream and cook through until it too is reduced
  8. Serve with a parsley garnish
Recipe Notes

I have no idea how many Calories in a serve. I use 500 Calories as my standard default number.

 

Photographs

Pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage in the frying pan

Coles pulled pork

The finished product

Coles pulled pork
Hot and spicy pulled pork with sweet corn and cabbage

Questions and answers

Don’t you feel like a fraud cooking with ready-made products?

Not at all. Life’s too short. This product is convenient and it tastes fine. If it didn’t taste any good I wouldn’t use it.

Are you sponsored by Coles?

No, Yummy Lummy has no sponsors.

Do you want to be sponsored?

I wouldn’t mind being given products to review. I’d always declare of course if I was given something for free.

Cooking meals for one on Facebook

It’s been a while since I plugged the Facebook group Cooking meals for one. If you’d like to join please send me a message via Facebook and I’ll hook you up. We have a few regular members who contribute daily and it’s nice to see what other people cook and get some inspiration from their creations.

If you live alone or if you cook for maybe one other person, feel free to join our group.

How is my weight loss going?

You may have noticed over the last few posts that the food is low carb. I’m trying to lose some weight. I started at 87 kg and after about seven weeks, I’m down to 82 kg. My aim is to get well below 80 kg if I can. I’d love your encouragement to keep going.

Coles leftover pulled pork nachos

 

Crispy pork crackling may help smarten kids

Crispy pork crackling may help smarten kids
Yummy Lummy

 
 
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Crispy pork crackling may help smarten kids

Crispy pork crackling may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you are pregnant but this week it was salty goodness that had me thinking. I need to back up a bit to explain.

Jump to RecipePhotos Q&A

Iodine deficiency

This post does have a recipe I promise you but it is really written to get any readers who may be pregnant or who are thinking about having children to be very aware of the role of iodine in the intellectual development of children. The role of iodine is important from the time of conception when a zygote forms and an embryo implants, through the gestation and then in the early life as a baby and infant.

This post isn’t a physiology lesson but I’d appreciate if you look up the role of iodine and perhaps visit my other blog where I describe a lecture I attended last week on iodine deficiency and the ramifications for the intellectual development of young Australians. The bottom line is that iodine supplementation during pregnancy is something to seriously consider.

Iodised salt

Sources of iodine include dairy products (albeit not as much as previously [see my other blog about that]), bread (because most bread in Australia is made with iodised salt), and iodised salt.

Obviously, too much salt is a problem for heart health, but if you need to add salt, use iodised salt and avoid fancy new age crap like seas salt and rock salt that offer no additional health benefits and may, in fact, be noxious to your health. Iodised table and cooking salt are also usually cheaper.

Saxa iodised table salt

This is not an advertisement for the Saxa brand

crispy pork crackling iodised salt

Recipe

Crispy pork crackling

Crispy pork crackling
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 5 mins
 
This is a never fail recipe for getting crispy crunchy pork crackling.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • Pork rashers
  • Iodised salt
  • Chilli flakes
  • Sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Cut the skin off each rasher and lay the skin on some baking paper on a thin oven tray.
  2. Sprinkle liberally with iodised table salt
    crispy pork crackling iodised salt
  3. Place into an oven at 200 °C/400 °F for one hour
  4. Place the skinless rashers into a frying pan lined with baking paper
  5. Sprinkle on the meat some sesame seeds and chilli flakes
  6. Place into an oven at 200 °C/400 °F for one hour
  7. When cooked, pull out the rasher meat and place onto absorbent paper and allow to cool a little. Do the same for the crackling too.
  8. Cut the rashers into small bite-sized chunks
  9. Serve on a plate with the crackling
  10. Eat with chopsticks and serve with a dipping sauce. Rick and Morty's Sichuan Teriyaki dipping sauce would work a charm here.
Recipe Notes

You may want to eat this with a cup of tea. It's really quite fatty.

Please note I never check the energy values. I use 500 Calories as my default. 

 

Photograph

The finished product

Crispy pork crackling. This would go well with my Rick and Morty Sichuan Dipping Sauce.

crispy pork crackling iodised salt
Crackling and pork

Questions and answers

What sort of salt do you normally buy?

I usually buy iodised table salt. I have also bought sea salt and rock salt. I reckon the only good use for rock salt is when making something like salted caramel when you want a concentrated hit of salt surrounded by sweetness.

What do you think of Himalayan rock salt?

After listening to Prof. Eastman the other night I’ll never buy it again. He reckons the murky colour is due to impurities like heavy metals which may be noxious to human health. I’ll probably also avoid Murray River salt too for the same reason. I mean have to see the crap in the Murray River.

Are you going to tell your daughters to supplement with iodine when they become pregnant?

Of course, I want bright grandchildren, not idiots.

Podcasting

I’m thinking of starting a cooking podcast. I’m happy to receive suggestions.

 

 

Pork red curry

Pork red curry
Yummy Lummy

 
 
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OMG my taste buds came alive with this pork red curry

I have no idea what the traditional way to make a pork red curry. I made this meal for one, the way I thought it would taste best. The best way I know how to cook pork rashers is to put them into a hot oven for an hour and render out as much fat as possible.

 

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the side bar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

By subscribing you’ll receive a personalised e-mail from me and from time to time, apart from the blog post I’ll share something new, like my ideas for a cook book sometime this year.

Here’s what you need to make this pork red curry

  • One small tray of pork rashers
  • Three tablespoons of Thai red curry paste
  • One teaspoon of chopped jalapeño peppers
  • Two teaspoons of chopped red chillies
  • The zest from one lemon
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • A small tin of coconut cream
  • About a handful of sugar snap peas
  • Half a red onion
  • Six cherry tomatoes
  • Enough Udon noodles for one person (this means you can choose to eat big or small)

Here’s how to put it altogether

  1. Put the pork rashers into a small nonstick frying pan and put that into a hot (200 °C/400 °F) for one hour. When the hour is up place the cooked rashers onto absorbent paper and allow them to cool to room temperature. Cut the rashers across the grain into one centimetre width strips and place these into a bowl.
  2. Cook the noodles in boiling water. Halve the time recommended, you only want them soft, not cooked through. Drain them thoroughly. Toss them so they do not stick.
  3. Heat up a wok and add some high boiling point cooking oil. I used avocado oil.
  4. When the wok starts to smoke add the sliced onion, the sugar snap peas and tomatoes. Once these vegetables begin to soften add the drained noodles.
  5. Move everything around the wok quickly and add the Thai red curry paste. I don’t think it matters what sort of paste you use. I just buy the cheapest I can find. Of course, you could make your own but life’s too short for that. I then add the pork. 
  6. Once the curry paste has coated everything add a dash of water and stir while it boils away. At this stage, throw in the chillies and jalapeño peppers.
  7. Squeeze in the juice from half a lemon.
  8. Add the tin of coconut cream and simmer until it reduces to a thick liquid.
  9. Transfer to a bowl and garnish with lemon zest.

How did it taste?

Roast belly pork red curry with noodles, tomatoes, sugar snap peas and lemon zest Gary Lum
Roast belly pork red curry with noodles, tomatoes, sugar snap peas and lemon zest

OMG, this was really nice. I’m sure I could have made it better with some authentic herbs and other ingredients, but I really liked this.

If you live alone and just want something you can cook for yourself, here’s a good one.  

Final thoughts

If you try this please let me know how you go.

Can you do me another favour please

I’m sort of transitioning my blogging to balance between food blogging and light hearted ‘medical’ podcasting. Please check out the podcast at drgarylum.com/blog

You can also subscribe via iTunes and Stitcher

What happened to my routine?

What happened to my routine?
What I ate this week

 
 
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A topsy-turvy week means no routine and no salmon

So, last week I posted about how I had finished February in my usual eating routine. This week has been a little unusual. A day in Sydney, a dinner out I didn’t end up getting to, and senate estimates put my week out of whack.

Monday Maccas

Rather than the usual Salmon Monday, I went with Maccas Monday after flying back from Sydney.

Two Big Macs Gary Lum routine
Two Big Macs

Please do me a favour

I think I’ve managed to work out how to use e-mail lists for sending post notifications and newsletters. I’d love it if you would sign up using the ‘form’ in the side bar (if you’re using a laptop or desktop) or at the bottom of the post (if you’re using a mobile device).

By subscribing you’ll receive a personalised e-mail from me and from time to time, apart from the blog post I’ll share something new, like my ideas for a cook book sometime this year.

Tuesday dinner out turned into dinner in

I was meant to go out to dinner on Tuesday night with friends from work (hospital) but I ended up having to do something work related.

I ended up buying a roast chicken from Coles and making a roast chicken sandwich.

Roast chicken roll with aioli and spring onion cream cheese Gary Lum routine
Roast chicken roll with aioli and spring onion cream cheese

Wednesday Senate estimates

Three times a year public servants appear before senators to answer questions about their program areas. In days gone by I’d eat a steak at the Hellenic Club, however, lately, my boss has been taking a few of us out to dinner which has been a very pleasant change.

I have no photographs of dinner, just the large coffee I had in the morning.

Happy #humpday I need a large one for today. Thanks Urban Bean Gary Lum routine
Happy #humpday I need a large one for today. Thanks Urban Bean

I also have a shot of an abandoned building near where I work.

Canberra, our national capital. Home of fine public art with #abandoned buildings left for years surrounded by fencing suggesting activity but #noactivity Gary Lum routine
Canberra, our national capital. Home of fine public art with #abandoned buildings left for years surrounded by fencing suggesting activity but #noactivity

Thursday saw some normality

Lunch was crispy squid from Urban Bean Espresso Bar.

Crispy squid salad from Urban Bean Gary Lum routine
Crispy squid salad from Urban Bean

Dinner was leftover chicken on a piece of bread that was smothered in oil and heated in the oven to give it a fried bread effect. I laid the skin over the top to help stop the stringy breast meat from drying out too much. I’m not a fan of breasts, I much prefer thighs.

Leftover roast chicken on a fried cream cheese bread roll with peas and corn Gary Lum routine
Leftover roast chicken on a fried cream cheese bread roll with peas and corn

The best thing about Thursday was that even though it wasn’t pay day, it was the start of the NRL season and the Brisbane Broncos defeated the Cronulla Sharks.

The 2017 #NRL season kicks off tonight. Let's GO Brisbane Broncos. Coffee with Urban Bean almond and white chocolate muffin. Gary Lum routine
The 2017 #NRL season kicks off tonight. Let’s GO Brisbane Broncos.
Coffee with Urban Bean almond and white chocolate muffin.

Friday means a day at the hospital, and…

Lunch in the staff tuck shop. I went with roast vegetables. They were very salty.

Meat-free Friday roast vegetables Gary Lum routine
Meat-free Friday roast vegetables

Dinner was a concoction that included a Chicken Maryland, two mushrooms, lots of Coon cheese, peas, corn and a piece of bread.

Cheesy Chicken Maryland on oven fried Colby cheesy bread with mushrooms, peas and corn Gary Lum routine
Cheesy Chicken Maryland on oven fried Colby cheesy bread with mushrooms, peas and corn
Triple chocolate ice cream Gary Lum routine
Triple chocolate ice cream

How did I cope?

I really prefer routine.

Final thoughts

I hope you had a good week. Did you eat well?

Can you do me another favour please

I’m sort of transitioning my blogging to balance between food blogging and light hearted ‘medical’ podcasting. Please check out the podcast at drgarylum.com/blog

You can also subscribe via iTunes and Stitcher

The Royal Darwin Hospital and the 2002 Bali Bombings

The Royal Darwin Hospital and the 2002 Bali Bombings

 
 
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I originally wrote this on 12 October 2012, the tenth anniversary of the 2002 Bali bombings and I had it on the Old Yummy Lummy blog. I thought I should update the post a little and bring it over to my current blog. I’d welcome comments and feedback.


This post is not like my regular food posts. Today I’m recalling the memories and experiences from October 2002. This post is by no means a complete recollection, I don’t want to bore you with minutiæ, it may not even be the highlights, it’s more likely the things that come to mind as I write. I’ve decided against including clinical images. I realise most readers of this blog prefer to see food rather than burnt and traumatised human flesh.

Saturday night 12 October 2002

I attended a dinner meeting of the then Australasian College of Health Service Executives (now the Australasian College of Health Service Management). It was a good night, I spent time with my friend and colleague, Dr Len Notaras plus many others. [That had been a good year. On 20 May, I accepted Len’s encouragement to act as the Executive Director of the Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) while maintaining my role as Supervising Pathologist and Director of Pathology for the Northern Territory Government. ]

That night in Kuta, Australians, other foreign nationals and the local people of Bali and Indonesia were enjoying a night out. Map http://goo.gl/maps/ZHdGP

While we slept in Darwin bombs exploded in Kuta. In the end, it’s thought 202 people died and another 209 people were significantly injured.

Sunday 13 October 2002

That morning the news services reported on the bombings. There was not a lot of information about the health needs that would be required for the people injured. A young man who was slightly injured managed to catch a flight from Bali to Darwin and he presented to the Emergency Department at RDH. He provided the first insight for us on what happened. Later in the morning I was receiving telephone calls that we needed to meet at the hospital because Darwin may be used as an entry point for the survivors who needed acute critical care.

My best friend, Dr Len Notaras, AM

Dr Len Notaras was meeting with Clare Martin, the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory who was in communication with the then Prime Minister of Australia, Hon. John Howard. Len provided reassurance to the CM and the PM that patients could be brought to Darwin and we would look after them.

Australian Defence Force reserves are amazing

At Richmond, RAAF flight crew were departing in a C-130 to pick up some of our doctors and assess the situation in Bali. The initial thinking was there would be a scoop and run operation of walking wounded (as opposed to stay and play). The early information was vague and inaccurate. We had a general surgeon (Dr David Read) and an anæsthetist (Dr Sue Winter) take satellite telephones with them from the RDH. These two doctors were reservists and full-time staff specialists at RDH. With our RDH telecommunications devices, we were able to collect raw information from the field. Such information proved invaluable and much more accurate when compared to information from official sources.

Getting together at the Royal Darwin Hospital

In the early afternoon, the hospital executive including senior clinical leaders met to discuss how we would manage patients being flown across. We didn’t know how many patients nor what condition they would be in. We called in a lot of staff, being careful not to call in into work the entire staff knowing this would be a multi-day campaign and we were conscious of fatigue. Many clinicians, pathology scientists, professional officers, administrative and general duties staff volunteered to help. I have memories of garden staff coming in to move equipment and patients as we decanted patients and equipment around the hospital, to the collocated Darwin Private Hospital and to home.

The RDH Boardroom which acted as our command and control centre. It’s not like the modern day room we have in the Australian Government Department of Health (Health).

Moving patients out to make space

We agreed to decant the two general surgical wards on the second floor, we got all the patients in the hospital in the know and many agreed to go home or somewhere else. We decanted the less sick patients who needed to stay to an old vacant cafeteria area. Some patients we had to force to stay, they wanted to leave to allow their place to be taken by a bombing victim. By the end we had discharged 100 patients to make room and to free up staff.

We moved high dependency patients to the co-located Darwin Private Hospital. We were lucky, we only had one patient in our Intensive Care Unit. We were lucky, Darwin was hosting a meeting of anæsthetists that weekend. We were lucky we had a reasonable amount of time to prepare.

Like any other hospital, despite making bed space available, we still had patients presenting to the ED to be seen. I recall one of my pathology staff fell from his bicycle and needed attention in the ED at the time. A young girl swallowed a fish that went down the wrong way and ended in her airway. She needed urgent attention while the ED went about quietly and calmly preparing.

By the evening we had the second floor clear, the medical wards had also reduced their patient numbers, the ICU had a single patient and we had kitchen and support staff in to keep the hospital going.

Accurate information makes all the difference

Throughout the night we received calls from Dr David Read and Dr Sue Winter who had flown to Bali with the RAAF. We were on the telephone with DFAT and other agencies. The then NT Minister for Health came through at 2100 ACST and she did a walk through with Len and me. We knew in the early morning the first flight would come in and then over about six hours we would receive all the patients. We knew some patients were also being flown to Perth. It was spooky walking through the empty surgical wards of a silent hospital.

During the evening a burns and critical care team from Adelaide arrived to assist. The team from the Royal Adelaide Hospital worked seamlessly with our staff. We had local General Practitioners volunteering to help.

Food, money and letters

It became known across Australia what we were preparing for and over the next thirty-six hours what we were doing. The news spread across the world. Within Australia, Australians were calling us and sending us food. One lady from Adelaide sent up a heap of pies by an overnight courier. Another lady rang a local Darwin pizza shop and sent pizzas.

In the weeks following I received letters from school kids from around the world. A bloke in Texas sent me hundreds of US dollars in notes and coins in an envelope.

Monday 14 October 2002 Bali bombings

The patients arrive

Over the Monday morning and early afternoon, four flights of RAAF C-130 Hercules flew in and brought patients to us with burns, trauma and high speed shrapnel and blast injuries. I remember the smell of the patients, the burnt flesh. I remember how they looked, the most severely burnt patient had no ears, lips or nose. I thought one patient who was being wheeled in in front of me was dead. Then his arm moved and I knew he was alive. He did not survive. I was in the ICU before he died. His bed was gushing with fluid that was coming away from him. We later learnt he wasn’t Australian, he was Greek. Our ICU team were able to make contact with his family in Greece. They were told in his last hours a hospital chaplain held his hand, spoke, sang and prayed with him as he died.

Surgeons and physicians working together in perfect harmony

If you’re medically or nursing qualified, the most fascinating and invigorating and spirit enhancing thing was watching specialist physicians, surgeons and their trainees along with other medical practitioners and registered nurses working together. I mean truly working together. The traditional medical referral system was halted for a day or so. Surgeons worked their science and art wherever they could. Debridement and fasciotomies were being performed in wards, corridors and operating theatres. Physicians were working as metabolic teams. They didn’t know their patients, there was no time and many of them were too sick for a relationship with their doctor. We enlisted medical students to ferry pathology results and assist in other very useful ways. The pathology and radiology areas were run ragged.

What about pathology, the heart of medicine?

I made time to visit Building 13, my building, the Pathology Department at RDH. My close colleagues in the laboratory, my friends were working frantically. Results were needed by physicians to stabilise and resuscitate patients. The hæmatology, chemical pathology and blood transfusion laboratory scientists were working around the clock.

An infection control and prevention nightmare of epic proportions

Over the days my speciality interest in Clinical Microbiology was needed. The hospital in Bali did a great job but they ran out of supplies and equipment early. To keep cool and to find relief, many patients before the burns took over were conscious enough to cool themselves with water from wherever they could find it. The water wasn’t always clean. Some patients were sitting in water. Bali is replete with multi-antimicrobial resistant bacteria. The patients’ burn wounds were being infected before they left Bali. We spread multi-drug resistant bacteria around Australia as we transferred patients around the country. We had introduced an infection control nightmare. I struggled to stay on top of that plus everything else. Fortunately, Darwin has the highest concentration of infectious diseases experts in the universe.

Rack, pack and stack

After all the patients arrived, the job was to assess, resuscitate and for the severe burns patients transport to a burns unit in another state.

With colleagues in Health in Canberra and the connections we had with the ADF, senior clinicians from RDH arranged for a milk run around Australia to transport burns and some trauma patients around the country. We did our best to place patients in their home state or territory. That couldn’t always happen. Their clinical needs were paramount. Some patients managed to get direct flights into Brisbane and Adelaide via other aeromedical evacuation (AME) services. I recall with some happiness seeing the Brisbane team arrive and recognising a senior staff specialist from the Princess Alexandra Hospital come and retrieve a couple of patients.

I can remember so many inspiring stories from the days and weeks afterwards. We had visiting dignitaries from within and without Australia. We received updates from burns bosses in the other Australian centres about the patients we shared, those summaries were shared with staff so they knew the destiny and outcome of the patients they got to know briefly but intimately. The cooperation amongst the burns units around Australia was great. There was a lot of information sharing between everyone.

Disappointment

It was about that time I applied to become the permanent General Manager of the Royal Darwin Hospital. I remember the disappointment of being turned down. May to December of 2002 was the most meaningful period of my career. I’ve done lots of other things and done things I’m proud of. The proudest career moments though for me were sharing time with everyone from Royal Darwin Hospital. Working with the best hospital staff anywhere on earth. I’m conscious that most people think their workplace, especially if it’s a hospital thinks where they work or where they trained is the best. I just know what I know and I’m happy with that thought to last me forever.

Mr Howard, OM, AC inspired the NCCTRC with Dr Len Notaras

Since then the National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre has been established. I was there when it began and now I work in the Australian Government Department of Health and part of my job (from 2007 to 2012) was the administration of the funding agreement associated with the NCCTRC. I work with my friend and colleague Dr Len Notaras, AM just like I did when I was in Darwin. The icing on the cake has been the contract between the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane and the NCCTRC. I did the bulk of my medical and specialty training at PAH. It is fantastic to see them working together. RDH and PAH are my two favourite hospitals, the hospitals that built my career, the hospitals that made me the person I am, it is such a good feeling knowing they have a working relationship around trauma.

War and disaster conference 2012

Last weekend (remember I wrote this originally in 2012) from Thursday evening to Saturday evening I found myself in Darwin for the NCCTRC’s war and disaster conference. I had the best time. We had a dinner with Hon. John Howard, OM AC speaking about the Australian Government’s experience at the time of the first Bali bombings. The new Chief Minister Hon. Terry Mills spoke too. Kamahl was there too to entertain us. Len Notaras’s wife, Robyn Cahill also sang at the dinner. On the Friday we had a clinical symposium for the RDH and visiting PAH clinicians as well as some special guests like Dr Mark Little from Cairns Base Hospital. He spoke about the evacuation of the Cairns Base Hospital for Tropical Cyclone Yasi. On the Saturday we had a Clinical Conference which I spoke at. I also did some media. Here is a short clip of an interview. I’ve been told other aspects of what I said were reported elsewhere http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-10-04/bali-bombings-doctors-warn-on-disaster-response/4295686?section=nt

You can’t get more Australian than a barbecue

Back to 2002. Move the clock forward four weeks and we had a barbecue. There was some criticism given the nature of most of the wounds were burns. We thought about it and agreed that the best way to thank the entire hospital was to hold an event revolving around food and letting everyone have some down time. A barbecue was still the best option. So in mid-November, Len and I and others from within the NT health bureaucracy arranged a huge staff barbecue. I cooked meat and happily fed the hungry. I remember Rodney, one of our groundsmen coming back four times. I remember that night arranging for platters to be delivered and for Len and I to walk through every ward and to speak with and share food with everyone on night duty.

The staff barbecue. I cooked lots of meat.

Honoured

Move the clock forward a year and some of us were included in the special 2002 Bali bombings investiture. I thought long and hard about it. Was I worthy. I wasn’t sure. I decided to agree to accept membership of the Order of Australia. Afterwards there was criticism. How did people get chosen? Why only so few? I queried whether I should relinquish my membership. I spoke with people close to me and I was reminded by so many that I represented the hospital, the people of RDH. Whenever I look at the lapel pin in my jacket or sign my name with the post nomials, I think of the victims and I think of the people at RDH. I try not to always think of the same person but to think about everyone I can remember from that time.

Move the clock forward and what have we done? We have the NCCTRC. We have the Office of Health Protection. We have the National Incident Room which I used to manage (2007 to 2012). We have national health emergency preparedness plans for mass trauma and other events. We have evolved. We have grown.

Inside the Aileen Plant National Incident Room.

Importantly the relationship between Australia and Indonesia has grown significantly. The relationship between Darwin and Bali has blossomed. The relationship between RDH/NCCTRC and Sanglah Hospital is fraternal and now involves regular staff exchanges. The relationship between the people of Bali and Australia has become intimate in so many ways. Whatever the motivation was for those responsible for the 2002 Bali bombings on 12 October 2002, the result has been a development of preparedness and response from the health sector and a closer bond between the peoples of two countries and two cultures.

Gary

Some extra reading

War and Disaster

Bali Honours List Below the list of the individuals honoured by Australia for their contributions in the response to the October 12, 2002, tragedy in Kuta, Bali.

In Honour of Some Heroes of this War (please read to acknowledge them as many have not)

The Darwin Hospital miracle

Full list: Bali honours

Sanglah General Hospital http://sanglahhospitalbali.com/v1/index.php

Map http://goo.gl/maps/dLw9v

 

How to make pork and cabbage soup

How to make pork and cabbage soup

 
 
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Click on the play button above for the audio podcast. The YouTube video is below.

Pork and cabbage soup on Canberra labour day 2016, what a great idea! A great way to use leftover slowly cooked pork shoulder.

It’s been two long weekends in a row. Not a bad thing. This weekend also marked the beginning of daylight saving in some states and the Australian Capital Territory. Getting an extra day to manage a slightly earlier start is a good thing.

The weather in Canberra has been good. On Saturday and today, we’ve had rain and overcast skies. Sunday was bright, shiny and relatively warm. I managed to get out for a walk around Lake Ginninderra and shoot a couple of photographs. I wanted to play with some new software. It seemed to produce a couple of nice pictures.

Lake Ginninderra photographs

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The cabbage soup

On Sunday, I put a boneless pork shoulder in the slow cooker and had a nice simple pork and cabbage dinner. Today I used some of the leftover pork and boiled some cabbage along with some coconut milk to make a nice soup.

What went into the cabbage soup

  • Leftover pork shoulder in bite sized chunks
  • A quarter of a small drumhead cabbage finely shredded
  • One packet of salt reduced French onion soup
  • Use a single jalapeño pepper and red chilli sliced with the seeds included
  • Two hundred and seventy millilitres of coconut milk

How to put the cabbage soup together

  1. In a large saucepan boil the cabbage and French onion soup until the cabbage is soft.
  2. Toss in the pork and bring it back to the boil for a couple of minutes to heat the pork through.
  3. Drain out most of the water and add the coconut milk and bring it to the boil and then turn down the heat and allow it to simmer for a few minutes.
  4. Ladle the soup into a large bowl and then garnish with the chillies and peppers along with some chopped chives.

How does the cabbage soup taste?

Pork and cabbage soup

It was pretty good. I thought about adding some curry powder, but the chilli and peppers added the right amount of spice while the coconut milk gave it a creamy texture.

Final words

As a kid, I didn’t like cabbage very much but as an adult, I’ve come to enjoy it as a vegetable that can absorb flavours much like pasta can. While boiling it removes the nutritional value, the fibre is still in it and it makes a great filler.

If you try this recipe please let me know what you think.

Rainbow over Lake Ginninderra