How to make a Kransky battered sav?

Kransky battered sav

I’ll explain the origin story of this Kransky battered sav in my other blog. Suffice to say this is part of a food challenge from some work colleagues.


Battered sav origin story at My Thoughts and Stuff


Jump to Recipe Photos Q&AMedical Fun Facts

Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce Gary Lum
Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce

Recipe

Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce Gary Lum
Print
How to make a Kransky battered sav with Japanese and Korean tones
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
25 mins
 
How to make a Kransky battered sav with Japanese and Korean tones. A fusion food challenge to beat them all.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 1000 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 2 Kransky sausages
  • 1/2 cup Self raising flour
  • 3 tablespoons Plain flour
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 cup Water
  • 2 Eggs lightly beaten
  • 3 tablespoons Chilli flakes
  • 10 centimetres Wasabi from a tube
  • 3 tablespoons Aioli
  • 2 tablespoons Kim chi
  • 3 tablespoons Tomato sauce
  • Coleslaw
Instructions
  1. Heat some vegetable oil in a wok and get it to 180 °C
    Vegetable oil Gary Lum
  2. Shaft a Kransky sausage up its clacker with a skewer
  3. Combine the chilli flakes, flours, bicarbonate of soda, water and the egg and process with a stick blender until it is smooth

  4. Dip the Kransky sausage into the batter and cover it, make sure it's a nice thick batter that covers the full length of the big thick sausage
  5. Gently placed the coated sausage into the hot oil and cook for about 2 minutes
  6. Remove the big thick gnarly battered sausage from the oil and place on absorbent paper towel
  7. Reapply the thick gooey batter to the already coated sausage and then cook again
  8. Cook for a further 2 minutes and then allow to rest for a few minutes
  9. Serve with some Kim chi, wasabi aioli (made by adding some wasabi to aioli) and tomato sauce along with some coleslaw

  10. Shoot a photograph
  11. Eat these big thick sausages and dip liberally into the various sauces
  12. Wash the dishes
  13. Write the recipe
  14. Write a blog post and hope readers share this post on social media

Photographs

Kransky in the delicatessen at Coles

From Coles Westfield Belconnen

Kransky sausages Gary Lum
Kransky sausages

Kim chi from the Asian grocery store

From Angkor Wat in Belconnen

Kim chi Gary Lum
Kim chi

Finished plate ready for tea

Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce Gary Lum
Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce

Questions and answers

Why do you like battered savs?

Well, I mean who wouldn’t love a battered sav. A battered sav is an iconic Australian food much like a meat pie or a vanilla slice.

Is the battered sav a euphemism for anything?

Well of course it is. It wouldn’t be Australia if we didn’t imply a sexual aspect to something so phallic.
The best example of this was made famous by Roy and HG.

If you want more from Roy and HJ check out their new podcast. I listen to them every Saturday evening.

Why the Kim chi?

I was describing the food challenge to a friend at Canberra Hospital and Health Services on Friday and she suggested Kim chi rather than sauerkraut.
If you want more about the origin story, please head over to My Thoughts and Stuff.

Medical Fun Facts

A new show drops at 7 pm on Monday 11 September 2017 (Canberra time). This week’s show is about hæmaturia or blood in your urine.

Click on the thumbnail above and you'll be taken to the show notes. It will be available after the show drops. Gary Lum
Click on the thumbnail above and you’ll be taken to the show notes. It will be available after the show drops.

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11 Responses

  1. As always, my taste buds are in a state of amazed confusion. The battered sav thing I get, it’s all those other tastes that have me intrigued & pretty desperate to try, I mean…. what would all those tastes “taste like” …. you got me thinking Gary.

  2. The battered sausage is beloved of Scots too, though our version isn’t as fancy as this. They certainly look delicious.

    1. Wow, Emma, I never knew that. I did know that the Scots love to deep fry, but there you go. I liked these Kransky battered savs, but now I’ve done it I’m not sure I’ll do it again.

  3. Dipping it twice sounds VERY intriguing!! I love your wording…How to make food sexy. hmmm, are these an aphrodisiac?

  4. I’ve never actually had a battered sav. It looks appetising I must say. I’m not sure if it’s something that you commonly find around, because I have never seen it in food courts or even in the frozen section of Woolies or Coles. Or maybe it’s a Canberra. I really don’t know 😀

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