Steak

Oven roasted scotch fillet steak with cheesy creamy vegetables Meater review

Oven roasted scotch fillet steak with cheesy creamy vegetables

MEATER® review

Photos Questions

At the beginning of every January, Trevor Long, Chris Bowen and Geoff Quattromani from the EFTM podcast make their annual pilgrimage to CES in Las Vegas. EFTM is a technology, motor car and lifestyle podcast primarily aimed at blokes. It’s not safe for work (NSFW), it’s not safe for kids to listen to, and, it is very blokey. While at CES Geoff wrote a review of the MEATER®️ meat thermometer on the EFTM website.

This is a photograph of my scotch fillet steak cooked rare with the cheesy creamy horseradish flavoured vegetables in a dish. The meat is cut and obviously rare.

While I own and use very basic meat thermometers, using one requires opening and closing the oven door multiples times. I prefer not to open the door until the food is ready. The Bluetooth and wireless capability of the MEATER®️ meat thermometer sounded like a good solution. It would mean I could cook meat for the right period of time without overcooking the flesh.

I went to the MEATER®️ website and looked through all the information and decided to buy one. The manufacturers have an Australian agent and as soon as I completed the order I received an e-mail explaining the product was ordered but there would be a slight delay. About a week later I received another e-mail informing me of another slight delay. All in all, the total waiting time was about a month. This didn’t really worry me and I was grateful for the regular updates.

When my new MEATER®️ meat thermometer arrived at my post office box, I was really impressed with the no-frills packaging. It gave me the feeling of a precision instrument.

This is a photograph of the MEATER® in its box

I’ve used my MEATER®️ meat thermometer about half a dozen times now in chicken (Maryland pieces), beef (scotch fillet steak) and pork (chops). It’s been brilliant. The meat has been cooked well and each meal has been distinguished by moist, tender and juicy animal flesh. I’m yet to try lamb, but I can’t imagine there will be any problems.

The iOS app works well and I’ve not experienced any Bluetooth connection problems. On Instagram and Twitter search for #meatermade to get an idea of the sorts of meals, people are cooking with their MEATER®️ meat thermometer. After each meal is cooked, I get an e-mail survey asking me how my meal was. I’ll probably turn this feature off when the novelty wears off. Notifications in the app work well and five minutes (this can be adjusted) before the end of the cooking time a tone is emitted and it gives you enough time to prepare to get the meat out and to allow the meat to rest.

This is a screenshot from the MEATER® iOS app of tonight's cook.

Leave the MEATER®️ meat thermometer in the meat until resting is complete and then simply wash it in warm soapy water. It comes in a wooden box which houses an AAA battery which charges the probe before each use.

This is a photograph of the box which my MEATER® came in.

Recipe

Oven roasted scotch fillet steak with cheesy creamy vegetables
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Oven roasted scotch fillet steak using the MEATER®️ meat thermometer to achieve a perfect medium rare steak which I served with some cheesy creamy vegetables.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 1 Scotch fillet steak seasoned with salt, pepper, and garlic powder and vacuum packed.
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Peas
  • Corn
  • Cream
  • Cheese grated
  • Horseradish cream
Instructions
  1. Pat the steak dry and season both sides with iodised salt, black pepper and garlic powder.
  2. Vacuum pack and refrigerate overnight.
    This is a photograph of the seasoned scotch fillet steak in its vacuum packing.
  3. Remove the steak from the refrigerator an hour before cooking to get it to room temperature.
    This is a photograph of the scotch fillet steak with the MEATER® inserted
  4. Insert the MEATER®️ meat thermometer into the steak and place on a baking sheet.
  5. Place the steak into a preheated oven (200 °C/400 °F).

  6. Cook using the MEATER®️ App.
  7. Rest the meat as per the app.
  8. While the steak was cooking put the broccoli, cauliflower, peas and corn into a microwave radiation safe container and cook using microwave radiation until the broccoli is soft.
  9. Drain the vegetables and put them in an ovenproof dish with some cream and cheese.
  10. When the steak and Brussels sprouts are removed from the oven, put the vegetables into the oven, turn the heat up to high to brown the cheese.
  11. Sear the steak with a torch or use a hot frying pan or if you want the best, go outside and use a flamethrower.
    This is a photograph of the rare scotch fillet steak which I've cut into slices.
  12. Serve the steak and vegetables on a plate.
    This is a photograph of my scotch fillet steak cooked rare with the cheesy creamy horseradish flavoured vegetables in a dish. The meat is cut and obviously rare.
  13. Shoot a photograph.
  14. Savour the meal.
  15. Write the recipe.
  16. Write the blog post.
  17. Hope your readers will share the post on social media.
Recipe Notes

I do not work out, look up or calculate the energy content of my meals. In this recipe plugin I have to add a figure, so I default to 500 Calories (500,000 calories).

Photographs

As well as some photographs of dishes I’ve previously cooked using the MEATER®.

Click on one image and then scroll through all the photographs.

Questions and answers

What’s the advantage of using a meat thermometer?

The most important reason is food safety. You do not want to undercook your meat. This is especially true for poultry. Always shop, prepare and cook with an assumption in your head that every chicken, duck, turkey and goose contains Salmonella and Campylobacter in its main cavity. Given the proximity of the main body cavity with the major cut of flesh, bacterial contamination is really easy.

For chicken, you want the internal temperature to get to about 75 °C/167 °F.

For mammals, most cuts are large muscle bundles and are effectively isolated from the body cavities. Mammal meat is relatively safe when it comes to pathogenic bacteria assuming the meat processing and butchering have been managed safely.

Because, most mammalian meat is best eaten rare or bordering on medium rare, precise temperature measurement is an advantage. Hence, the advantage of a meat thermometer.

What’s your favourite cut of beef?

There’s a lot of argument on what makes a good steak. In my find, a good steak tastes beefy and it is tender. The best compromise for pan frying in my limited experience is scotch fillet or rib eye fillet steak.

The flavour though of porterhouse or rump cap is really rich and if I could cook that so it was tender I’d be really happy.

There may be a change on that front soon. I’ve purchased a water recirculator and I’m going to experiment with sous vide cooking.

Should you use a steak knife when eating steak?

OMG, yes. Cutting steak effectively and efficiently adds to the whole eating experience. While you can cut a properly cooked steak with a butter knife, why would you? A well-weighted steak knife makes all the difference. A well-balanced steak knife is a thing of beauty. A well-made steak knife is a tool to treasure, protect and maintain.

You seem to like the MEATER®️ meat thermometer. Were you paid by them for this review?

No, Yummy Lummy currently receives no sponsorship or financial support. If MEATER®️ wants to send me products to try, I’m happy to discuss an opportunity.

Update (Tuesday, 13 February, 2018)

I was asked about the price of the MEATER®, I was able to buy it on-line in January 2018 for AUD$129.

Final words

So I’ve dipped my toes back into podcasting. I recently closed off my health and medical podcast so I can now focus entirely on food blogging.

I will be recording and dropping a regular weekly show soon. It will be called, “The Yummy Lummy Cooking for one podcast.”

What I’ve done recently is start a super short random show named, “Random Yummy.” I’ve dropped two shows so far. You can find them at:

https://YummyLummy.com/RY0001

https://YummyLummy.com/RY0002

Let me know what you think.

So dear reader, do you regularly use a meat thermometer? Let me know in the comments section below.

Dijon mustard and chives crusted scotch fillet steak

Scotch fillet steak on a Saturday night is even better if it’s a steak sandwich

I watched a Nicko’s Kitchen video on YouTube recently on how to cook a perfect scotch fillet steak. My technique is slightly different in that I follow the Heston Blumenthal method of rapid flipping every fifteen to twenty seconds.

 

Anyway, I wanted a steak sandwich for dinner. I liked the way Nicko crusted his steak by using Dijon mustard and chopped chives. It looked very pretty. It also added a nice taste too. 

What you’ll need

Scotch fillet steak

Salt

Olive oil

Butter

Thyme

Chives

Dijon mustard

Cracked pepper

Lettuce

Tomato

Swiss cheese slices

Bread roll

Here’s what you do

Slice the bread roll into halves

Apply some Dijon mustard to the inside of each half

Add a slice of Swiss cheese

Put the bread under a grill for a few minutes to slightly melt the cheese

Remove some lettuce leaves and wash them

Slice the tomato and allow it to rest on some paper towel

Apple some pepper to one side of the tomato

The steak should have been in the refrigerator for about half a day at least uncovered

Take the steak out at least an hour before you’re ready to cook to get it to room temperature

Rub some olive oil all over the steak

Season the steak with salt

Get a pan smoking hot

Put the steak in the pan and flip every 15 to 20 seconds and cook until you like it

I like my steak rare

Add some thyme and a bit of butter and allow the butter to melt and the thyme to flavour the meat

Let the steak rest for at least 5 minutes

Coat one side of the steak with Dijon Mustard

Flip the steak over onto a plate of chopped chives and coat the steak

Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard Gary Lum
Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard [Click on the photograph for a full view]
Slice into the desired thickness

Prepare the steak sandwich with the bread roll and melted cheese

Enjoy a nice juicy steak sandwich

Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard sandwich Gary Lum
Scotch fillet steak with chives and Dijon mustard sandwich [Click on the photo for a full view]

Parting words

I regularly post photographs of food to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Please feel free to connect with me on any social media platform.
I also have a podcast. It’s not food related but each show is short and it’s named Medical Fun Facts. You can find it in the iTunes podcast store as well as Stitcher. A show drops every Monday and Tuesday. It has a little cynicism, a little scepticism and occasionally some sarcasm.

What I’ve eaten this week

Another week

It’s been a good week in food. While my predictability remains high, there has been some variation. I’ve also been trying to vary how I share what I’ve been eating. I’m using Snapchat more especially video which I share via Instagram. I’ve also been producing a few more YouTube videos to share how I have prepared food. I set up a page for them.

Split pea and ham soup

Last Sunday I made split pea and ham soup again in an attempt to get it to look more green. Instead of carrot I used potato. It wasn’t much greener.

 

Slow cooker split green pea and ham soup with Jalapeño peppers and chilli for kick
Slow cooker split green pea and ham soup with Jalapeño peppers and chilli for kick

Salmon

I cooked salmon in paper one night and a quick pan fried version the following evening.

Salmon cooked in paper with sugar snap peas and onion served with avocado
Salmon cooked in paper with sugar snap peas and onion served with avocado
Salmon cooked in paper with sugar snap peas and onion served with avocado
Salmon cooked in paper with sugar snap peas and onion served with avocado

Pan fried salmon with pearl barley couscous and chickpeas
Pan fried salmon with pearl barley couscous and chickpeas

Chicken Maryland

On Wednesday night I made cheesy Chicken Maryland with leftover slow cooker oyster blade steak.

Slow cooker oyster blade steak with Chicken Maryland served with avocado
Slow cooker oyster blade steak with Chicken Maryland served with avocado

On Friday evening I wrapped my Chicken Maryland in Pialligo estate artisan bacon

Bacon wrapped chicken Maryland
Bacon wrapped chicken Maryland

Chicken schnitzel wrap

On Thursday at lunch time I had a chicken schnitzel with chips wrap with friends

Royal chicken schnitzel chip butty with pink lemonade
Royal chicken schnitzel chip butty with pink lemonade

McDonald’s Double Quarter Pounder with a large vanilla thick shake

Thursday was a long day. I started with a 6 am teleconference and ended with a lecture at the ANU Medical School from 5.30 to 7.15 pm. I stopped at McDonalds on the way back to the apartment.

#dinner of champions from @mcdonaldsau #snapchat #iphone #instafood #foodporn #yummy

A video posted by Yummy Lummy Gary Lum Food Blog (@yummylummyblog) on

Raisin toast after a 6 am teleconference #breakfast #yummy #delicious #instafood #foodporn #iphone #snapchat

A video posted by Yummy Lummy Gary Lum Food Blog (@yummylummyblog) on

 

Roast pork with crispy crackling and potatoes

On Friday while working at The Canberra Hospital I enjoyed a meal of roast pork with crispy crackling and potatoes

Roast pig with crispy crackling and spuds #lunch #yummy #delicious #instafood #foodporn #iphone #snapchat

A video posted by Yummy Lummy Gary Lum Food Blog (@yummylummyblog) on

 

Bacon and eggs

Saturday morning called for bacon and eggs

Pialligo Estate bacon and eggs
Pialligo Estate bacon and eggs

Garlo’s pie and sausage roll

Saturday lunch was a little extravagant with a pie and sausage roll

Garlo’s pie and sausage roll for #lunch #delicious #yummy #foodporn #instafood #iphone #snapchat

A video posted by Gary Lum (@garydlum) on

Garlo's beef and mushroom pie with Worcestershire sauce and a Garlo's sausage roll with barbecue sauce
Garlo’s beef and mushroom pie with Worcestershire sauce and a Garlo’s sausage roll with barbecue sauce

 

Fried noodles

Saturday night was ‘vegetarian’ fried noodles with vegetables

Fried noodles with cheese and vegetables
Fried noodles with cheese and vegetables

Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra

It’s a 3 pelican day on #lakeginninderra #belconnen #canberra #cbr #iphone #snapchat

A video posted by Gary Lum (@garydlum) on

Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Park bench on Lake Ginninderra
Park bench on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra
Pelicans on Lake Ginninderra

Baked fried pan grilled jerk chicken wings in buffalo barbecue sauce

Mmm…chicken wings in America are really good.

Photograph of Chicken Wings baked fried and chargrilled jerk seasoned wings tossed in buffalo barbecue sauce

I’m in Washington, D.C. for work at the moment. I was recently chatting with an American friend on Twitter about barbecue food and she mentioned chicken wings. I love chicken wings. As much as I am a ‘thigh man’, chicken wings are fantastic. The meat is always tender and sweet and it’s relatively easy to get the skin to be nice and crispy.

I thought I would take the opportunity while I am in the USA to try some barbecue chicken wings.

I ordered some from the room service menu. They arrived hot and smelled really good.

Unfortunately, the room lighting was poor. I had all the incandescent lamps on and in a dark room the yellow cast was very pronounced.

The wings were good. The skin was crispy, salty and sweet with a little tang. The meat was moist, tender and soft enough to be sucked off the bone. The serving size was also generous. I forgot to add the blue cheese sauce into the photograph. My friend asked if I had some. Indeed I did.

I’d happily eat these again.

I also ate a nice ribeye steak with the bone in last night.

Ribeye steak I’m developing a real liking for Mac and cheese with my main meals 

I went to another place with colleagues and enjoyed a nice pork chop with Brussels sprouts cooked with bacon and a side of Mac and cheese. That was really nice.

I spent a little time at the Capitol building and got to sit in and watch a couple of senators make speeches on national security.

Abraham Lincoln looks sad
Abraham Lincoln looks sad
Geographical centre of Washington, D.C.
Geographical centre of Washington, D.C.

How to cook a steak like Heston Blumenthal

Regular readers know I like steak and some of you know that I’ve cooked steak like Heston before. Now that I’m back on a low carb kick I’ve been dreaming of a nice steak dinner since picking up a piece of ribeye from Coles on the weekend.

I began preparing the steak this morning as I was making breakfast. I unwrapped the meat and laid it on a rack and then on a plate and put it back in the refrigerator to dry out a little.


This is Heston explaining his steak cooking method

When I arrived home after work I pulled the steak out and placed it on the kitchen bench to let it get to room temperature (which in Canberra today wasn’t much different to the temperature inside my refrigerator).


 

This is my steak after it had been drying in the refrigerator

Ribeye steak out of the refrigerator waiting to be cooked and eaten.
Ribeye steak out of the refrigerator waiting to be cooked and eaten.
How to cook a steak like Heston Blumenthal
Recipe Type: Dinner
Cuisine: Australian
Author: Gary Lum
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • Ribeye fillet steak
  • Fennel
  • Parsley
  • Bok choi stalk
  • Red onion
  • Lime juice
  • Mayonnaise
Instructions
  1. In the morning before leaving for work unwrap the steak and put it on a rack on a plate and put it back in the refrigerator
  2. When you get home after work pull the steak out and put it on the kitchen bench to equilibrate to room temperature
  3. Cut the fennel, parsley and red onion into thin slices and squeeze the juice from half a lime
  4. Put the salad together
  5. Slice the stalk of some bok choi and set aside
  6. Get a frypan really hot and add some grape seed oil plus a bit of butter
  7. When the pan is smoking hot put the steak in the frypan
  8. Count slowly to fifteen and turn
  9. Repeat this for a total of 3 minutes
  10. When the steak is cooked put it aside in a warm place and let it rest for 10 full minutes
  11. While the frypan is still hot add the bok choi stalk slices and fry off
  12. After 10 minutes resting plate it all up
  13. Shoot a photograph
  14. Eat the meal
  15. Wash the dishes
  16. Write the recipe
  17. Blog (verb)

This is the steak and fennel salad plated up

Steak and fennel salad after the meat has been rested for 10 minutes.
Steak and fennel salad after the meat has been rested for 10 minutes.

Here is my breakfast this morning. Streaky bacon cooked in a benchtop oven and served with a fried egg.

Pay day bacon and egg
Pay day bacon and egg

So how do you like to cook steak?

Porterhouse Steak Heston Style

The Porterhouse steak Heston style is the second Heston style dish I’ve done today. For breakfast I made scrambled eggs Heston style 

2015-02-22_17.48.22_006_GARY_LUM_FB

Here’s a video of Heston on MasterChef Australia describing his cooking technique.

 

 

Unfortunately, Heston doesn’t complete the TimTam Slam in this video. 

So tonight I used a Porterhouse steak which is a little unusual for me because I prefer rib fillet. Given the cost of living, the cost of meat and the need to budget more carefully I went with Porterhouse steak.

To accompany my porterhouse steak I had an avocado that I coated with pepper and chilli flakes. I also prepared a simple fennel salad with red onion, parsley and capers.

Porterhouse Steak Heston Style
 
Recipe Type: Dinner
Cuisine: Australian
Author: Gary Lum
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • Porterhouse steak
  • Avocado
  • Fennel
  • Parsley
  • Red onion
  • Capers
  • Pepper
  • Salt
  • Chilli flakes
  • Lemon juice
Instructions
  1. The night before place the steak on a rack and on a plate and put into the refrigerator. This helps the steak dry out.
  2. Allow the steak to get to room temperature.
  3. Just before cooking rib in some oil and a little salt.
  4. In a smoking hot pan sear the steak and keep flipping every 15 seconds for a total of four minutes.
  5. Seal the edges, especially the fat.
  6. Allow the steak to rest for 10 minutes.
  7. Half an avocado and cover in lemon juice and then coat with cracked pepper and chilli flakes
  8. Prepare the fennel salad with fennel, parsley, red onion, capers and lemon juice.
  9. Slice the steak and put onto a plate, add the salad and then the avocado.
  10. Shoot a photograph.
  11. Eat the dish.
  12. Wash the dishes.
  13. Write the recipe.
  14. Blog (verb)
 

 

2015-02-22_15.57.59_001_GARY_LUM_FB 2015-02-22_17.35.26_002_GARY_LUM_FB 2015-02-22_17.35.41_003_GARY_LUM_FB 2015-02-22_17.35.53_004_GARY_LUM_FB

I drained the lemon juice out of the fennel salad by straining in a coffee filter paper.

2015-02-22_17.47.03_005_GARY_LUM_FB

 

You can see the steak is rare in the middle and nicely coloured on the outside. The fat could have been rendered better but it was fine (I like animal fat).

So how do you like to cook your steak? 

Chifley’s Bar and Grill in the Hotel Kurrajong

It’s Thursday evening and Bron and I go to dinner at Chifley’s Bar and Grill in the Hotel Kurrajong. The restaurant was named after Ben Chifley (Australia’s sixteenth prime minister) and the restaurant specialises in beef and locally sourced produce.

As we arrive at about 7 pm we notice the courtyard with many of the tables occupied with local Canberrans enjoying an after work drink. The clue to knowing they are local Canberrans is that many of them are still wearing lanyards bearing Australian Government identification tags (and they’re also dressed in business attire).

Chifley's Bar and Grill on Urbanspoon

On confirming our reservation we’re shown to a table near the kitchen and the function rooms. It’s a relatively quiet night in the restaurant so we effectively get a waiter to ourselves. The service is very good. Our waiter is knowledgeable about the menu and very helpful. He attends to us fairly regularly through the evening asking if we’re okay and checking that the food is meeting our expectations.


For an entrée I went for the crispy sardine fillets (with salsa rossa).

Grilled sardines at Chifley's Bar and Grill in Hotel Kurrajong
Grilled sardines

The sardines were crispy and tasty. This is the first time I’ve eaten sardines that weren’t from a tin in oil. I could definitely eat a bigger plate of these.


For a main meal dish I went for steak, after all Chifley’s Bar and Grill is all about the premium steaks it serves and I ordered the  Sher wagyu fi Scotch fillet with a marbling score of 5+. I asked for horseradish aioli and the steaks came with celeriac purée.

Sher Wagyu Fi Scotch fillet +5 at Chifley's Bar and Grill at Hotel Kurrajong
Sher Wagyu Fi Scotch fillet +5 with celeriac purée and horseradish aioli

When I got my piece of steak I thought I’d died and gone to food heaven. I’ve never enjoyed steak so much. 

We also got some pommes frites which were delightful.


For dessert I had the vanilla panna cotta. It was nice.

Vanilla panna cotta at Chifley's Bar and Grill at Hotel Kurrajong
Vanilla panna cotta

I’m very happy to recommend Chifley’s Bar and Grill. The steak is amazing. I would like to become a regular steak eater here.

 

Steak and vegetables

Mum and Dad rarely eat steak now. It’s too expensive and they’re careful of their teeth. They both have a lot of dental work and they prefer not to chew anything tough. I promised a juicy and tender steak  

I explained to Mum the theory behind Heston Blumenthal’s technique for perfect steak and the importance of resting the meat to get a perfect rare to medium rare steak. I also took the advantage of buying some Scotch rib eye fillet which makes a tender steak pretty well guaranteed unless you neglect it. Mum and Dad love their vegetables so we also had some boiled spuds (potatoes for you refined readers), sweet potato, snow peas, asparagus and sweet corn on the cob.

Scotch rib fillet steak after sitting out to dry and getting to room temperature. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/2.2, 1/40sec, ISO 250
Scotch rib fillet steak after sitting out to dry and getting to room temperature. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/2.2, 1/40sec, ISO 250
Spuds ready to boil in the saucepan. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/5.6, 1/10sec, ISO 320
Spuds ready to boil in the saucepan. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/5.6, 1/10sec, ISO 320
Scotch rib fillet steak resting and letting the wonderful juices keep the meaty goodness all tender. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/5.6, 1/10sec, ISO 1250
Scotch rib fillet steak resting and letting the wonderful juices keep the meaty goodness all tender. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/5.6, 1/10sec, ISO 1250
Saturday dinner. Scotch rib fillet with spuds, sweet potato, snow peas, asparagus and corn. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/5.6, 1/10sec, ISO 2000
Saturday dinner. Scotch rib fillet with spuds, sweet potato, snow peas, asparagus and corn. SONY ILCE-7S with E 35mm F1.8 OSS at 35mm and f/5.6, 1/10sec, ISO 2000

Mum and Dad were pretty happy and enjoyed the meal. 

Easy 5 minute steak meal

It rained today so my plan to go for a walk didn’t eventuate. I’ve put on so much weight, I need to exercise and eat less. Well after last night I really need to eat less. 

I made a light and easy steak dinner. The steak was a Scotch rib fillet that was about 1 cm thick and it had a nice amount of deckle around the lean fillet.

Scotch rib fillet steak NIKON D5300 with 40.0 mm f/2.8 at 40mm and f/8, 1/5sec, ISO 800
Scotch rib fillet steak NIKON D5300 with 40.0 mm f/2.8 at 40mm and f/8, 1/5sec, ISO 800

I left the steak out on the bench for 2 hours to let it get to room temperature and to reduce the moisture content.

Bread and butter NIKON D5300 with 40.0 mm f/2.8 at 40mm and f/8, 1/5sec, ISO 280
Bread and butter NIKON D5300 with 40.0 mm f/2.8 at 40mm and f/8, 1/5sec, ISO 280

I needed some fried bread as a base for the steak. The steak always tastes good with fried bread. Frying bread in real butter is also important. 

Sweet potato NIKON D5300 with 40.0 mm f/2.8 at 40mm and f/8, 1/5sec, ISO 360
Sweet potato NIKON D5300 with 40.0 mm f/2.8 at 40mm and f/8, 1/5sec, ISO 360

I like sweet potato. I cooked this with the steak. In the finished product you can see the char marks 

Saturday dinner. Scotch rib fillet steak with spinach, capsicum and sweet potato. NIKON D7100 with 90.0 mm f/2.8 at 90mm and f/16, 1/25sec, ISO 400
Saturday dinner. Scotch rib fillet steak with spinach, capsicum and sweet potato. NIKON D7100 with 90.0 mm f/2.8 at 90mm and f/16, 1/25sec, ISO 400

I like to cook my steak rare. I use the Heston Blumenthal method. I have a timer set for 5 minutes and the frying pan set to high. I turn the steak every 20 seconds. I then let it rest for at least 5 minutes. The resting is the most important part. 

So do you like to eat a quick and easy minute steak?

 
If you have any comments or questions please send me a comment in the space below.

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Hope you have a great weekend and eat YUMMY