BBQ beef short ribs

BBQ beef short ribs

When I was buying the beef short ribs yesterday I had no idea it would snow in Canberra as I was cooking them. Given Canberra experienced hail and snow flurries comfort food in the form of BBQ beef short ribs seemed like a good choice.

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What I didn’t realise when I purchased the pack of ribs was they were all separated and not a set of ribs. It turns out this worked in my favour as it made plating up the ribs at the end of cooking easier.

Beef short ribs after 4 hours in the oven and served with a Kensington Pride mango salad Gary Lum
Beef short ribs after 4 hours in the oven and served with a Kensington Pride mango salad

Recipe

Beef short ribs after 4 hours in the oven and served with a Kensington Pride mango salad Gary Lum
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BBQ beef short ribs slowly cooked in a low oven
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
4 hr
Total Time
4 hr 10 mins
 
It rained, hailed and snowed in Canberra today and this BBQ beef short ribs dish was perfect especially with the oven on keeping my apartment nice and warm.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Australian
Servings: 1
Calories: 750 kcal
Author: Gary Lum
Ingredients
  • 1 Packet Beef short ribs
  • 1 Sweet potato
  • 1 Onion
  • 1 Cup BBQ sauce
  • 1/2 Cup Red wine
  • 1/4 Cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 Pinches Black pepper
  • 2 Pinches Sea salt
  • 2 Pinches Chilli flakes
  • 2 Pinches Garlic powder
  • 1 Tomato
  • 1 Kensington Pride mango
  • 2 Cups Salad leaves
Instructions
  1. Set the oven to 120 °C
    Beef short ribs 822 g at $11.34 Gary Lum
  2. Line a baking tray with baking paper to keep it clean and to avoid baked on meat and sauce
  3. Lay in the ribs, sweet potato and onion
  4. Squirt the BBQ sauce onto the ribs and add the garlic powder, pepper, salt and chilli flakes
  5. Add some red wine, Worcestershire sauce to keep everything moist as the water in the liquid ingredients boils and elaborates steam (note you cannot see steam, it's the gas form of water, what you can see is water vapour)
    Beef short ribs ready for the oven with barbecue sauce, chilli flakes, garlic powder, red wine and Worcestershire sauce. There's a sweet potato and onions in there too. Gary Lum
  6. Seal the baking tray with some aluminium (note it is not aluminum) foil
  7. Place into the oven for four hours
  8. After four hours cooking, allow the meat to rest for twenty to thirty minutes
  9. Put together a mango salad and plate up the ribs and salad
  10. Shoot a photograph
  11. Eat the meal
  12. Wash the dishes
  13. Write the recipe
  14. Write a blog post and hope people share the post on social media

Photographs

Vacuum packed beef short ribs

Beef short ribs 822 g at $11.34 Gary Lum
Beef short ribs 822 g at $11.34

Ready for the oven

Beef short ribs ready for the oven with barbecue sauce, chilli flakes, garlic powder, red wine and Worcestershire sauce. There's a sweet potato and onions in there too. Gary Lum
Beef short ribs ready for the oven with barbecue sauce, chilli flakes, garlic powder, red wine and Worcestershire sauce. There’s a sweet potato and onions in there too.

Ready for “inhaling”

Beef short ribs after 4 hours in the oven and served with a Kensington Pride mango salad Gary Lum
Beef short ribs after 4 hours in the oven and served with a Kensington Pride mango salad

The taste of Summer

Kensington Pride mangoes in August in Canberra Gary Lum
Kensington Pride mangoes in August in Canberra

Questions and answers

How did you get a Kensington Pride mango in August?

The crops in the Top End have started harvesting early this year. The mangoes currently on sale are very expensive at $4 each but a mango salad gives a taste of summer and I’m sick of Canberra winter. I hate Canberra winter.

What sort of red wine did you use?

It was a $5 bottle of Shiraz. I know there are gourmets who say you should only use wine that you would drink meaning you should cook with good quality wine, but I can’t drink alcohol so I wouldn’t have a clue. I reckon that advice is just to help liquor stores sell more expensive wine.

Do you add chilli flakes to everything you eat?

Almost everything I eat has chilli flakes added to it. I really like chilli flakes.

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33 Responses

  1. Now just between me & thee Gary, the weather in Canberra is a touch droll, freakin’ freezing actually but it does give one permission to make the best of the best comfort foods, so right there my friend is an upside of living in the freeze zone. I do hope you got to admire the snow, maybe threw a snowball at a pollie for fun too.

    1. Haha Anna, no one will ever convince me the weather here is anything but horrible.
      I’ve visited the snow areas before and didn’t find it that enjoyable.
      I reckon the whole of Canberra would benefit if the national capital was moved to Airlie Beach, or Cairns or East Arnhem Land. My job would then be even better than what it is now.
      I’m jealous of the weather you enjoy at the moment, albeit tropical cyclones can be very sucky.

  2. Gary this is so weird, the last two days I saw your blog it didn’t have this recipe but now I see it! Must be caching issues. Anyway I saw mangoes too and did a double take especially in this cold weather!

    1. I’ve noticed caching problems too Lorraine. I’ll have to fix that.
      I can’t go past mangoes. I feel like they are part of who I am.

  3. It’s a good thing I don’t require the snow, as I live in Florida! Sound delicious – it is a ‘Must try’ recipe.

  4. Oh my! What I do to eat those ribs for lunch instead of my leftovers! They look fantastic Gary and I can envision the meat falling of the bone.

    1. Unfortunately beef short ribs aren’t cheap. But I think it’s worth having a go and it’s pretty simple.

    2. It’s ridiculous that what used to be cheap cuts have now become ‘gourmet’ and suddenly the price rises.
      I bet the fatty anterior ribs will soon become popular and even those bones will become expensive.

    3. That’s just silly, just like chicken necks are now expensive. I buy half a kilogram of chicken necks for stock but I’ve seen the prices rising.

    4. Turkey is crazy cheap (knock wood the prices don’t suddenly go up like the smoked picnic shoulder hams I used to brag about) and I always use the long necks for my stocks especially as there’s so much meat on the neck in comparison to chicken necks.

  5. I have some pork looking things in the fridge…this looks so good! Too much sugar, but I could cut the BBQ sauce out. (I never use the stuff). I think I’m also going to add something besides water!
    Query-why do you let your meat ‘rest’ before consuming???

    1. Thanks Kris. I always let meat rest, especially if it’s been ‘harshly’ cooked like pan fried. The juices are retained. I don’t know why it works but it does. For a slow low cooked dished it probably doesn’t matter but it does let the meat cool enough so when I plate it the heat doesn’t cause the salad to wilt immediately.

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